Lecture28.doc -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
For the p-p cycle to occur at all requires enormous temperatures of about 10 7  K.  Such  temperatures can and do occur at the center of the Sun.  From models, we deduce that the  temperature at the center of the Sun is about 15 million K. For stars more massive than the Sun, with higher temperatures in their centers, the  process is similar, the conversion of 4 hydrogen nuclei into a helium nucleus, but uses  carbon as a catalyst. The details are not important for us. NB:  Notice the important implication that we turn one element,  hydrogen, the most abundant element in stars, into another, helium,  and therefore change  the chemical composition of the Universe , since this process takes place in all stars like  the Sun. Just as the main sequence is a sequence of mass, with the more massive stars being the  hottest and most luminous, the main sequence is also a sequence of luminosity with L  M 4 . Eventually, a star must use up all of the hydrogen fuel; i.e. all of the hydrogen is  converted into helium.  What happens next? We can begin to approach this question by noting what happens in the Sun (or a star like  the Sun).     Imagine that a section of the core has used up all of its       hydrogen fuel. There is no longer any source of energy to maintain the pressure in that  section of core. That section of core must therefore be compressed (heating up still further).
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 3

Lecture28.doc -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online