Lecture08 - The Ecliptic, Celestial Motions, Time Here &...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Ecliptic, Celestial Motions, Time
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Here & Now (N) Here & Now (S) Here & Now (Constellation)
Background image of page 2
Celestial Equator and Pole We project the Earth into the sky, and its rotation appears reflected there. The “diurnal” (daily) motion of the sky is just due to the spinning Earth.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Rising and Setting Some stars never set from a given latitude (circumpolar). The size of the circumpolar region grows as you approach the poles. You can never see stars in the opposite circumpolar hemisphere. Stars may rise in the East, South East, or North East (so might the Sun).
Background image of page 4
Altitude of the NC Pole The altitude of the pole depends on your latitude. The Sun may never pass overhead (and doesn’t in Berkeley). The altitude of the Sun also depends on the season.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Celestial Coordinates To “map” a given point in the sky, you can specify how high it is, and in 
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/02/2011 for the course ASTRO 10 taught by Professor Norm during the Spring '06 term at University of California, Berkeley.

Page1 / 9

Lecture08 - The Ecliptic, Celestial Motions, Time Here &...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online