LAB:Linear momentum.pdf - PHYSICS 20300 u2013 LM2 44736...

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PHYSICS 20300 – LM2 44736 LAB: Linear Momentum Lab Jahanara Anah Portorreal Lab Instructor: C. Ordaz
INTRODUCTION For this experiment Physics Aviary Impulse Version 2 Lab Simulation was used. We learned from the impulse-momentum theorem, that the impulse produced by a net force is equal to the change in the object’s momentum. This leads to the principle of conservation of linear momentum which states that if the sum of the average external forces on a system is zero, then the total linear momentum of the system is conserved. Because of this, the final total momentum of the system after collision is the same as the initial total momentum of the system before the collision or ࠵? "⃗ ! = ࠵? "⃗ " . Although it may not seem like it, this type of conservation affects us on a daily basis. A real world example can be viewed when firing a rifle with the momentum being conserved in the recoil of the gun or even in the case when two players collide while playing football. This is why this experiment focuses on confirming this phenomenon to better understand what happens when we encounter this. It is expected that when the experiment is done, the initial momentum of the ball before colliding with a block will be the same as the final momentum of the ball after the collision. PROCEDURE We observed the change in momentum and speed in Wally’s by varying Wally’s mass. In this process we kept the impulse fixed. For example a constant impulse how speed and momentum vary with mass, we studied this change. To experimentally confirm the conservation of linear momentum, we followed the directions as stated on the instructions provided. We clicked on the center of the rectangular box on the page, the variables in this experiment were listed as mass of Wally the astronaut (mw) , magnitude of propulsion force from fire extinguisher (FNet) and duration of propulsion force from fire extinguisher (time, t).
Wally was relying in Newton's third law of motion, which is commonly rendered as, "Every action has an equal and opposite reaction." That is, all forces result from the interaction between two objects, and when two objects interact, they apply an equal amount of force to each other, with the forces acting in opposite directions. The difference that we see in movement is due to Newton's second law of motion (a=F/m, commonly rendered as F=ma), which shows that object with a lot of mass does not accelerate as much. Similarly, when you bounce a tennis ball off a brick wall, the wall does accelerate, but if

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