Pivot tables

Pivot tables - PivotTables BMGT301Dr.Karake Excels Pivot...

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PivotTables BMGT 301 – Dr. Karake Excel’s Pivot Table is probably the most useful and time-saving tool for analyzing data that’s in table format. In the simplest Pivot Table, one identifies a row value, a column value, and a data value. The data value (usually a numeric value) in this simple Pivot Table is automatically summarized at each row and column intersection. Source Data Requirements The most basic of Pivot Tables is created from source data that’s in a table or range in an Excel workbook. Data suitable for use in a Pivot Table must have these characteristics: 1. The top row of data contains column headers. 2. Each row of data is a record about a particular entity or transaction. 3. Each column of data holds the same kind of information. 4. There are no entirely blank rows in the data. 5. There are no entirely blank columns in the data. 6. If a column contains numbers, use a zero instead of a blank cell when you don’t have a value. In Excel 2007 a range of data that has the characteristics above can be specifically designated as a table . A Pivot Table can still be constructed, however, even if the data has not been so
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This note was uploaded on 03/02/2011 for the course BMGT 301 taught by Professor Wang during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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Pivot tables - PivotTables BMGT301Dr.Karake Excels Pivot...

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