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Conflict resolution strategies 1 Running Head: CONFLICT RESOLUTION STRATEGIES Conflict Resolution Strategies Mary Carebo University of Phoenix Mike Kanfer GEN 300
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Conflict resolution strategies 2 “Why don’t we just do it my way?” “Because your way is stupid!” “No it’s not!” “Yes it is! Why don’t you just shut up?!” “Okay guys, simmer down…now what exactly is the problem here?” How many times have you played the role of mediator in a similar exchange between children? Probably a countless number of times, since conflict resolution is often not the strong suit of children who are just beginning to learn to operate within a cooperative environment. Until the point where they either choose or are forced to work within the framework of a team, many times all that they have understood prior to that experience are terms such as “me,” “mine,” and “no.” Generally adults with a clear understanding of this commonplace issue, act as facilitators in such situations to our children proper etiquette, and to ensure that no kicking, fighting, or punching will occur in the event that a problem arises. While adult mediation in the case of children working together is a excellent idea, the question must be asked, who should be the designated mediator in the case of adults working together? This is due to the fact that oftentimes adults have a tendency to act in ways that are just as juvenile as children when it comes to teamwork and cooperation. To tell children how to work through their small problems is an easy task, but perhaps as adults some work on more mature strategies of conflict resolution is necessary to prevent the need for a referee when we, as adults, are working together.
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Conflict resolution strategies 3 The first rule of thumb when dealing with a situation in which a problem arises is summed up in a statement made by William James, an American philosopher and leader of the philosophical movement of pragmatism. Whenever in a conflict with someone, there is
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Order_No_ (1) - Conflict resolution strategies 1 Running...

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