Exam 1 - Study Guide

Exam 1 Study Guide - Introduction to Stories and Symbols 1 What are the basic characteristics of Myth Myths have plots(beginning middle and end

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Introduction to Stories and Symbols 1. What are the basic characteristics of Myth? - Myths have plots (beginning, middle and end), character (often with conflict that heightens and then is resolved), and a setting. - They are theatrical, describe relationships with the natural world, define humanity and evoke archetypes. a. In what way are myths traditional? - Same common themes: Gods, Power, Heroes, Body, and Death. - Same common features: theatrical, define relationships with the natural world, define humanity and evoke archetypes. b. Explain the differences between mythos and logos. - Mythos is a story, like the Greek myths. It is oral, anonymous and only passed on. - Logos is an account, like the New Testament. It is written, authored and an explanation. c. Name the three types of myths. - Divine Myths – explain the world (science) - Legends – explain past (history) - Folktales – teach behavior (novel/film) 2. What is iconography? - The process of decoding images into writing with themes and subjects. It incorporates describing the image, comparing the image to other similar images, and forming a possible theme for the story of the image. a. Using Vermeer’s Woman Holding a Balance as an example, explain the steps one would take to getting at its meaning. - Describe the image . – The image contains a lady, and she is holding a balance. She is standing at a table, which has pearls on it. There is a large painting behind the lady. There is also a window with little light and a mirror in front of her. - Compare the image. – The image is darker than others of its time with woman holding a scale. This woman is not using her scale. The picture is much simpler. She has pearls, which are not pictured in the other images. - Form a theme . – The woman is a visual representation of divine justice. She is telling the viewer to not be distracted by beauty (mirror) and worldly goods (pearls), heat and
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lust (furnace). She tells the viewer, make sure you realize that as time goes on and in the end you want to have the good outweigh the bad. The girl in the photo is deciding to use her pearls, loose her virginity, and live her life that way, or not to. i. Explain how two specific elements in the painting provide a key to a deeper iconographic meaning of the painting. - The scale in the image represents the weighing of good and bad. In this picture, the lady is being reminded to be careful of which path she takes, because in the end you want the good in your life to outweigh the bad. - The pearls in the painting are a symbol of virginity and pureness. The lady is using her scale and picking up a pearl. This is suggesting the lady is deciding whether to loose her virginity and go in one path in life, or whether to stay pure. 3.
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This note was uploaded on 03/05/2011 for the course ARTH 102 taught by Professor Gregg,c during the Fall '07 term at George Mason.

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Exam 1 Study Guide - Introduction to Stories and Symbols 1 What are the basic characteristics of Myth Myths have plots(beginning middle and end

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