Understanding Hearing Impairments

Understanding Hearing Impairments - Understanding Hearing...

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Understanding Hearing Impairments
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In class activity This will be submitted for attendance We are going to go through several statements of appropriate etiquette for interacting with persons who have hearing impairments. For each statement, identify: If you have violated it in the past If it would be difficult to follow in the future Do you disagree with the suggestion? If so, why?
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HI etiquette http://www.ucp.org/ucp_channeldoc.cfm/1/13/12632/12632-12632/6187 When communicating with a person with a hearing impairment, be sure you have his/her attention by touching him/her lightly on the shoulder or waving your hand. Look directly at the person and speak clearly and at a comfortable pace to establish if the person can read lips (not all people with hearing impairments can lip-read). Those who can will rely on facial expressions, other body language and gestures to help in understanding, so speak expressively but do not exaggerate your lip movement or shout (NOTE: It is estimated that only 4 out of 10 spoken words are visible on the lips). Show your consideration by placing yourself facing the light source and keeping your hands, cigarettes, and food away your mouth when speaking. Brief, concise written notes may be helpful.
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HI etiquette http://www.ucp.org/ucp_channeldoc.cfm/1/13/12632/12632-12632/6187 In the United States, most people who are deaf use American Sign Language (ASL). ASL is not, however, a universal language. It is a language with its own syntax and grammatical structure. When scheduling an interpreter for a non- English speaking person, be certain to retain an interpreter that speaks and interprets in the language of the person with the hearing impairment.
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HI etiquette http://www.ucp.org/ucp_channeldoc.cfm/1/13/12632/12632-12632/6187 Interpreters facilitate communication. They should not be consulted about matters concerning the person for whom they are interpreting. Do not shout at a person with a hearing impairment. Shouting distorts sounds accepted through hearing aids and inhibits lip reading. In order to facilitate conversation, be prepared to
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Understanding Hearing Impairments - Understanding Hearing...

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