21 - 9/21/10 Fallacies of Credibility and Context I....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 9/21/10 Fallacies of Credibility and Context I. Testimonial Evidence a. Most of what we know is based on the testimony of others. i. For example: 1. Doctors tell us that eating fatty food is bad for is and we believe it 2. Historians tell us Brutus killed Caesar and we believe it 3. The people who raised us tell us that they are out biological parents and we believe it ii. In short, we often take the word of others as evidence. I I. Credible Authorities a. To evaluate testimonial evidence, we have to assess the credibility of the witness (example: our doctors, historians, parents). b. Credible witness must meet two standards: i. They must be experts in the subject in question ii. They must be free of bias and/or ulterior motives I I I. Fallacies Involving Credibility a. The appeal to false authority i. This fallacy is committed when: 1. The authorities we cite are not experts in the field under discussion a. Example: Most doctors believe in God. Therefore, God exists....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/03/2011 for the course PHIL 100 taught by Professor Forte during the Fall '08 term at Bridgewater State University.

Page1 / 3

21 - 9/21/10 Fallacies of Credibility and Context I....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online