23 - 2. NOTE: In premise 1: ‘odd’ means ‘strange’...

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9/23/10 Fallacies of Logical Structure I. Fallacies of Logical Structure Kelley says that these fallacies involve “subtle logical errors with the argument itself.” Don’t all of the fallacies involve subtle logical errors? Didn’t the other fallacies occur within the argument itself? If not, where did they occur? a. Begging the Question i. This fallacy occurs when: 1. A person used the very proposition she is trying to prove as a premise in the argument. 2. A person uses an undefended proposition as a premise in an argument when the proposition is part of what is under debate. ii. Examples of Begging the Question 1. Same concept, different language. 2. Circularity amongst sub-arguments 3. The complex question 4. Suppressed premises b. Equivocation i. This fallacy occurs when: 1. The meaning of a word or phrase changes meaning midway through the argument.
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Unformatted text preview: 2. NOTE: In premise 1: ‘odd’ means ‘strange’ In premise 2: ‘odd’ means ‘not even’ c. Appeal to Ignorance i. This fallacy occurs when: 1. A person takes a proposition to be true because it has not been shown to be false 2. A person takes a proposition to be false because it has not been shown to be true. 3. NOTE: Arguments that reveal ignorance do not necessarily commit the fallacy of appealing to ignorance. 4. NOTE: Usually, absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. But sometimes it is. d. Diversion i. This fallacy occurs when: 1. A person changes the issue in the middle of an argument 2. When in the context of a debate someone distorts an opponents position, usually stating it in an over simplified or extreme form, and then refutes the distortion position not, the real one....
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2011 for the course PHIL 100 taught by Professor Forte during the Fall '08 term at Bridgewater State University.

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23 - 2. NOTE: In premise 1: ‘odd’ means ‘strange’...

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