Studying for Fallacies - Appeal to False Authority using...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Studying for Fallacies Subjectivism-using the fact that one believes or wants to believe a proposition to be true as evidence of its truth Appeal to Majority- using the fact that large numbers of people believe a proposition to be true as evidence of its truth Appeal to Emotion- trying to get someone to accept a proposition on the basis of an emotion Appeal to Force- trying to get someone to accept a proposition on the basis of a threat Begging the Question- trying to support a proposition with an argument in which that proposition is an implicit or explicit premise Equivocation- using a word or phrase in two different meanings in the premise or conclusion Appeal to ignorance- using the absence of evidence for a proposition as evidence for the truth of the opposing proposition Diversion- trying to support one proposition by arguing for another proposition
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Appeal to False Authority- using testimonial evidence for a proposition when the conditions for credibility are not satisfied Ad Hominem- using an irrelevant trait of a speaker as evidence that his statement is false or his argument is weak. False Alternatives- excluding relevant possibilities without justification. Post Hoc- using the fact the one event preceded another as sufficient evidence that the first caused the second Hasty Generalization- inferring a general proposition from an inadequate sample of particular cases Composition- inferring that a whole has a property merely because its parts have that property Division- inferring that a part has a property because the hole has that property....
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Ask a homework question - tutors are online