2.The Opium Wars Notes

2.The Opium Wars Notes - The Opium Wars(I) I. II. III. I V....

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The Opium Wars(I) I. The opium trade II. The “Napier Fizzle” of 1834 III. Charles Elliot and the opium issue IV. Commissioner Lin in Canton A. British reaction V. The Treaty of Nanking Key Terms “Country Trade” Jarine, Matheson and Company Taipan Lord William John Napier Lord Palmerston Charles Elliot Lin Zexu Imperial Comissioner Wei Yuan Hong Kong Chusan(Zhoushan) Dinghai Tianjin Qishan Chuenpi(Chuanbi) Chuenpi Convention Sir Henry Pottinger Sanyuanli Qiying Treaty of Nanking Extraterritoriality- With the exception of opium traders, Americans in china were subject to
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American laws, judges, courts and prisons Treaty of Wanghsia Treaty of Whampoa “Century of shame” Sinocentrism I.The Opium Trade Chinese had almost every advantage in trade 1826 trade was balanced, after 1826, began to be in B’s favour Ppl addicted to opium, produced sleepy dreamy feeling Death penalty in C for growing opium Laced with tobacco and smoke Allowed in C for medical purposes 1620s on island of Taiwan, first illegal use. Dutch introducted it. Opium and tobacco mixed together, smoked produces a high Opium abuse spread from Taiwan to mainland 1729 opium abuse large enough that emperor prohibits its abuse 1796 opium illegal B realize if they make enough opium demand, then they could make a killing Opium grown in British India Opium rolled into bowling balls. Bengall, sold to China B merchants drop off stuff in Bengall, then does private trade
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1820s “country trade” and “country ships” they go to the pearl river and under cover of night rowed small armed rowboats, then sell the things, row back to mainland and then product controlled by Chinese Volume increases exponentially, 1729- 200 chests/year sold. 1767- 1000 chests/year, 1820- 4500/year, 1837- 40 000/year By 1830 opium dens as common in china as gin houses in England B find out, lower the price, more market, increase profit by sheer volume Opium spread from Canton to anyone in the city Ching govnt had to take action because spreading from city to rural areas Dope trade draws in all foreign traders Jardine, Matheson and company handles 1/3 of all opium sold to China B control large amount of opium market in China, America gets in on it American traders hook up with Turkish opium producers, then send opium to China Roosevelt family got rich off opium trade B interested in opium, since ppl are more wealthy, they can charge more taxes B turns blind eye to opium problem, decide only fault of users China is bleeding silver by end of 1820s, bad enough, but China has a silver(big) and copper(small) currency, because of copper in relation to silver, taxes become huge Southern China ppl throw down the plough and turn to banditry because they can’t pay the taxes
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Why can’t China stop opium trade? -China doesn’t have coast guard
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2011 for the course HIST 317 taught by Professor Dr.wright during the Winter '11 term at University of Calgary.

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2.The Opium Wars Notes - The Opium Wars(I) I. II. III. I V....

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