343881470 - 30 Fungi Recyclers Pathogens Parasites and...

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30 Fungi: Recyclers, Pathogens, Parasites, and Plant Partners
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30 Fungi: Recyclers, Pathogens, Parasites, and Plant Partners 30.1 What Is a Fungus? 30.2 How Do Fungi Interact with Other Organisms? 30.3 What Variations Exist among Fungal Life Cycles? 30.4 How Have Fungi Evolved and Diversified?
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Figure 30.1 Fungi in Evolutionary Context Synapomorphies that distinguish the fungi: Absorptive heterotrophy Chitin in cell walls
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30.1 What Is a Fungus? Absorptive heterotrophy : Secrete digestive enzymes outside the body to break down large food molecules, then absorb the products. Saprobes : Absorb nutrients from dead organic matter Parasites : Absorb nutrients from living hosts Mutualists : Both partners benefit
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Figure 30.2 Phylogeny of the Fungi
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30.1 What Is a Fungus? Yeasts : Unicellular members of the zygomycetes, ascomycetes, and basidiomycetes. The term does not refer to a single taxonomic group but rather to a lifestyle that has evolved multiple times.
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Figure 30.3 Yeasts Are Unicellular Fungi
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30.1 What Is a Fungus? Multicellular fungi: Mycelium —composed of tubular filaments called hyphae Hyphae cell walls have chitin Some hyphae have incomplete cross walls or septa , and are called septate Hyphae without septa are called coenocytic
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Figure 30.4 Mycelia Are Made Up of Hyphae
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30.1 What Is a Fungus?
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2011 for the course BIO 112 taught by Professor Anaba during the Spring '10 term at Clark Atlanta.

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343881470 - 30 Fungi Recyclers Pathogens Parasites and...

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