cells01-2009

cells01-2009 - BIO 106 Cells Fall 2009 Professor Owen While...

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Unformatted text preview: BIO 106 Cells Fall 2009 Professor Owen While you wait for class to start, please read the Triathlete article Triathlete BIO 106 – Cells An Introduction to Cellular & Molecular Biology Professor Owen Office: 201A New London Hall 201A New London Hall Office Hours: Wed 1:00 – 2:30 Fri 12:00 – 1:30 Or send me an email (best) or give me a call! tpowe@conncoll.edu, x-2147 Course Information Moodle course site: Course Information Website will include: • Laboratory Methods – background on the experiment, lab assignment, assessment • Review materials: o Powerpoints of lecture materials (PDF) o Problem Sets to help you review for exams o Other handouts • Additional readings & web links • Grades Peer Mentor Program Jessica Sadick: jessica.sadick@conncoll.edu Lab • Lab − starts next week – Olin 313. • Expected to download, print, and read the lab information before your lab. • Experiments include: o DNA transformation and gene expression o Identification of transgenic crops by PCR o DNA & protein electrophoresis o Proteomics o Organelle isolation & assay o Microscopy (light & electron) • Focus on writing a scientific paper – Writing Enhanced “WE” course. course. Lecture 1 1 BIO 106 Cells Fall 2009 Professor Owen Lab Instructors Dr. Kris Hardeman (Sections 7, 8) Dr. Page Owen (3) Dr. Sardha Suriyapperuma (1, 5) (1 5) Mrs. Susan Warren (2, 4, 6) 1: Tu 9:00 – 11:45am 2: Tu 1:15 – 4:00 pm 3. Tu 7:00 – 9:45 pm 4: W 1:15 – 4:00 pm Dr. Suriyapperuma Mrs. Warren Dr. Owen Mrs. Warren 5: W 7:00 – 9:45 PM 6: Th 9:00 – 11:45 AM 7: Th 1:15 – 4:00 PM 8: F 1:15 – 4:00 PM Dr. Suriyapperuma Mrs. Warren Dr. Hardeman Dr. Hardeman Classroom Student Response System “clickers” • Active learning lasts longer than passive listening. You You will remember answers better if you answer them than if I just tell them to you. You You will learn even better when you discuss questions with each other before answering. Ability Ability to solve problems and in-depth inunderstanding of concepts. • Clicker use can lead to higher grades through active learning. • You and I can find out whether you understand a topic by anonymous class participation. But But questions are always welcome during class! Clickers • You will earn 4 points for every correct answer and 3 points for just answering and participating • At end of semester, lowest 3 scores will be dropped, including 0’s from forgotten clickers or absences or absences o So just participate and you get credit! (10% of total grade) • Register your clicker before class next Wednesday – will start tracking responses then • See me, for any reason, if you need help registering your clicker Date How do you vote? 1. Turn on the clicker by pressing the bottom “On/Off” button. 2. A blue “Power” light will appear at the top of the remote at the top of the remote. How How do you vote? 3. When I ask a question in class (and start the timer), select A, B, C, D, or E as your vote. How How do you know your vote was received? Check your “Vote Status” Light: I may also ask you to talk about your possible choice/answer with your neighbor neighbor or in groups. – Green light = your vote was sent AND received. – Red flashing light = you need to vote again. **Not sure you saw the light? Just vote again. **Want to change your vote? You can vote again as long as the timer is still going. Date Lecture 1 2 BIO 106 Cells Fall 2009 Professor Owen Registering your i>clicker Until Until you register your i>clicker, your responses are tied to your clicker remote ID (located on the back of your clicker), rather than to you. Wh When you do register, your previously recorded voting responses will be assigned to you. Registering your i>clicker online at www.iclicker.com 1. Go to www.iclicker.com. 2. Click “REGISTER.” 3. Enter these 4 details and click “submit.” IMPORTANT!! You MUST enter your network user ID in the STUDENT ID field to ensure proper crediting. That’s the 8-digit ID (00######). Note: Note: we may be selected to participate in a trial of webwebconnected devices – do we have WiFi in this room? Textbooks Alberts, Alberts, B., D. Bray, K. Hopkin, A. Hopkin, Johnson, J. Lewis, M. Raff, K. Roberts, P. Walter. 2009. Essential Essential Cell Biology, 3rd Edition. Garland Science NY Garland Science, NY ?2nd edition? – still of use… Knisely, Knisely, K. 2009. A Student Student Handbook for Writing in Biology, 3rd Edition. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA Course Grade • 60% total for the 4 exams • 30% total for laboratory assignments • 10% class participation (clickers, problem sets) Grades will be posted on the course web site. What is a Cell? Estimated that there are 10 – 100 million distinct species of living organisms (on Earth…). All Living Organisms are Constructed of Cells How are their cells similar? How are their cells different? Lecture 1 3 BIO 106 Cells Fall 2009 Professor Owen A Matter of Perspective? Central Dogma DNA RNA Protein Cell Biology Microscopy Biochemistry Molecular Biology Why? Cellular structure & function based on a 3D shape of proteins “Central Dogma” Molecules in cells have certain 3D shapes In all living cells, genetic information flows from: • DNA to RNA (transcription) and • from RNA to protein (translation). ECB3 1-2 Central Dogma Cell Biology in a Triathlete Article Triathlete Genetic information in a zygote Fertilization of egg with sperm DNA evolution DNA code determines physical properties and health 5. Commercial companies will examine your genetic profile (23andme.com) 6. Diseases can have a genetic basis 7. Conversion of food into chemical energy 8. Cell death 9. Bacterial symbiosis 10.Genetic 10.Genetic modification 1. 2. 3. 4. May 2009 What points from the central dogma are prominent in this article (written for a nonnonscientific audience)? Lecture 1 4 BIO 106 Cells Fall 2009 Professor Owen How to Read an Article 1. 2. 3. 4. Genetic information in a zygote Fertilization of egg with sperm DNA evolution DNA code determines physical properties and health 5. Commercial companies will examine your genetic profile (23andme.com) 6. 7. 8. 9. Diseases can have a genetic basis Conversion of food into chemical energy Cell death Bacterial symbiosis Cell Biology in a Triathlete Article Triathlete • Genetic information in a zygote (lab 1) • Fertilization of egg with sperm (lab 4) • DNA evolution (labs 10, 12); DNA code determines 12); physical properties and health (labs 7, 9 & 10) • Commercial companies will examine your genetic profil (23 profile (23andme.com) (lab 9) (l 9) • Diseases can have a genetic basis (lab 9) • Conversion of food into chemical energy (lab 11) • Cell death (lab 4) • Bacterial symbioses (lab 7) • Genetic modification (labs 5 & 7) • Reading scientific literature (lab 2 and others) 10. Genetic modification 23andme.com Why Triathlete? Triathlete http://www.alexmmtri.com/ Conn College ‘03 – Biology major M.D. from Univ. of VT; professional triathlete Lecture 1 5 ...
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