Examining Arguments

Examining Arguments - Examining Arguments Ethos = The...

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Unformatted text preview: Examining Arguments Ethos = The imaginary person your reader thinks of when they read your work. Usually changes for each assignment you write. Problems to look out for : Ethos too low (dont sound well-informed, appear amateurish)- When you use simple, formulaic organization patterns, you dont appear like an interesting, well- developed writer. Creativity suggests skill.- Not addressing issues on local terms creates a distant ethos, so use we when appropriate + analyze facts in terms of local, everyday life Ethos too high (sound too analytical, sound like an outsider)- When you use complicated words, avoid natural/conversational contractions, or act infallible (speak like you think your never wrong)- When you look at things from an impossibly large perspective (people believe they are unique, different from the larger issue itself) Avoiding a perspective that is too large Small annoyances are equally if not more persuasive than large, dangerous, extreme concerns, because most...
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2011 for the course ENG 11011 taught by Professor Dr.susant.lord during the Spring '08 term at Kent State.

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Examining Arguments - Examining Arguments Ethos = The...

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