Chapter 19 Post-Lecture Quiz with answers

Chapter 19 Post-Lecture Quiz with answers - 1 Chapter 19...

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1 Chapter 19 Post-lecture Quiz 1. Why is it difficult to get a good picture of what our Milky Way galaxy looks like? 1. We’re in the middle of one of its arms–no perspective 2. It is very large and the edges are far away and faint 3. Dust blocks our view when we look toward the center or in the plane 4. No one has ever taken a photo from both the top and side of it 5. All of the above 2. How do we get a good picture of what our Milky Way galaxy looks like? 1. Use infrared or microwaves to penetrate the dust 2. Use radio telescopes to see where clouds of hydrogen gas are 3. Take photos from both the top and side to get a good view 4. All of the above 5. 1 and 2 3. What does our galaxy look like? 1. A large disk with spiral or pinwheel arms, relatively flat and thin 2. Clouds of gas and dust in the spiral arms 3. Older yellow stars in the central bulge 4. Old stars and globular clusters in a spherical halo above and below the disk 5. All of the above 4. Why do stars in the halo of the galaxy have little of the common elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen? 1. Those elements have been used up in halo stars 2. C, N, and O are biological elements, and there is no life out there to make them 3. The halo stars formed before those elements were made 4. Making C, N, and O requires massive stars, and there are no massive stars in the halo 5. How do the elements produced in massive stars get into other stars? 1. Supernovae blow them out into space. 2. Red giant winds blow them into space. 3. The star-gas-star cycle circulates them 4. All of the above 5. #1 and #2
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2 6. Based on the idea of chemical enrichment, which types of stars contain a higher proportion of heavy elements: stars in globular clusters or stars in open clusters? 1.
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2011 for the course RSM 100 taught by Professor Oesch during the Spring '08 term at University of Toronto.

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Chapter 19 Post-Lecture Quiz with answers - 1 Chapter 19...

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