Political Distrust

Political Distrust - 1 American Presidents and Political...

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1 American Presidents and Political Distrust Sam Regalado HIST 3821 Chantel Rodríguez August 6, 2010
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2 Americans are hard-pressed to find any truth and honesty in modern politics. Considering recent events, it is understandable that Americans view politics negatively. Jokes are constantly circulating about how untruthful politics are. Politicians are deceiving, conniving, and say only what people want to hear. Furthermore, the bipartisanship of American politics places politicians in a head-to-head battle every day. At least, that is the popular consensus. Of course these are stereotypes, but almost all stereotypes develop from some truth, whether truthful in the past or present. The stereotype that politicians are dishonest is one that is true, and seems to only be getting worse. The film “Frost/Nixon” which described the Frost/Nixon interviews is an excellent example of publicly accusing dishonest politicians of their wrongdoings. Since Nixon and the Watergate Scandal, every president, who holds the highest political office in America, has been publicly accused of lying. Dishonest politicians and presidents have been woven into the fabric of America, and it is beginning to show the degeneration of our society. The degeneration of society in the United States is a harsh proclamation, but that does not refute the fact that dishonest politicians are almost expected in modern America. What is worse is that presidents are now seen as just as dishonest as the common man. Dishonest presidents have been common since John Quincy Adams, however their lying has been met with extreme hostility in recent years, including losing the presidency altogether. There is no problem with this because the president should be punished for lying. After all, he is the best known American worldwide, and he portrays American values to the world. Why then do Americans continue to elect presidents if they know they lie? The answer is that Americans still have hope in their president’s honesty, and because they are forced too by the bipartisan politics of America. The bipartisan politics of America can be saved for a later discussion, but hope in honest presidents is very prevalent today. President Barack Obama used “Hope” and “Change” as his
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3 main campaign slogans for the 2008 presidential election. Those two words are the exact two words Americans wanted to hear.
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