Prevention of Arizona Genocide

Prevention of Arizona Genocide - 1 The Prevention of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 The Prevention of Genocide in the Arizona Orphan Abduction Sam Regalado HIST 3821 Liz Zanoni June 28, 2010
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 The great Arizona orphan abduction is an extremely perturbing event in United States history. In Linda Gordon’s book, The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction , she argues that orphans were abducted from their adoptive families because of racial, cultural, and religious differences between Anglo-Americans and Mexicans living in America. The two terms used to describe the residents of Clifton and Morenci, Arizona, where the abductions occurred, will be explained later. Occurring in 1904 in Clifton and Morenci, Arizona (Clifton-Morenci), the orphan abductions served a much larger purpose to the Anglo residents of the towns. Anglo-Americans were trying to prevent genocide. The distribution of “white” orphans to Mexican families was seen as an attack on the white people of America. To prevent racial and cultural genocide of “white” Americans, Anglo-Americans in Clifton-Morenci, Arizona “rescued” orphans from the adoptive Mexican families while Catholic nuns tried to prevent the orphans from experiencing religious genocide. Genocide, as defined by the United Nations General Assembly is as follows: The Convention defines genocide as any of a number of acts committed with the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial or religious group: killing members of the group; causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group, and forcibly transferring children of the group to another group. 1 This definition is recognized worldwide as the best definition of genocide. It is extremely detailed and encompasses many different forms of genocide. The parts of the definition that relate to the Arizona orphan abduction involve “intent to destroy… a racial [and] or religious group” and “forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.” It is also 1 U.N General Assembly. Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide , 1948. New York, NY, 1948. < http://www.un.org/millennium/law/iv-1.htm>
Background image of page 2
3 important to note that genocide as a term did not yet exist in 1904. However, the parameters are very similar and from a historical perspective, genocide can accurately be used to describe the events that surrounded the Arizona orphan abduction. To understand why the abduction events are seen as genocide, one must first understand
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/07/2011 for the course HIST 3950 taught by Professor Snyder during the Summer '10 term at Minnesota.

Page1 / 6

Prevention of Arizona Genocide - 1 The Prevention of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online