Wilson and World War I

Wilson and World War I - 1 Eventual Participation in World...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Eventual Participation in World War I Sam Regalado HIST 3821 Liz Zanoni July 12, 2010
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Allied forces were relieved to hear that on April 6, 1917, the United States finally entered World War I. After three years of fighting with heavy economic and personal causalities, the war had reached a stalemate. The United States was widely seen as a force that could break the stalemate, and bring an Allied victory. The United States entered World War I only after three years of neutrality however. Since 1915, the U.S. had been withstanding aggression from warring nations, particularly Germany, but refused to fight. This was due largely in part to the leadership of President Woodrow Wilson. However, one month after winning re-election for his neutral stance, Wilson asked Congress to declare war. Wilson has been criticized for his quick and dramatic reversal concerning such an important issue. Upon further research of the subject however, one can see that Wilson may have foreseen that the war would eventually draw the United States into armed conflict. There are many reasons for why the United States entered the war, including economic and diplomatic reasons, and also largely for the safety of the United States. Such a dramatic ideological change only happens with careful thought and foresight however, and Wilson had both when considering the entry of the United States into World War I. Through examination of his speeches and actions, once can see that President Woodrow Wilson foresaw and advocated the eventual armed participation of the United States in World War I, and had been planning on entry for several months. Woodrow Wilson has been criticized for entering the United States in World War I. Debates concerning Wilson’s actions continued into the 1920’s, 1930’s, and even today. One popular criticism comes from the popular conservative radio and television host Glenn Beck who writes, “Wilson won reelection on keeping America out of war. A month after he was sworn in, we went to war.” 1 While this represents a modern conservative argument, Beck is not exclusive 1 Glenn Beck, “Propaganda in America,” Current Events and Politics , The Glenn Beck Program, http://www.glennbeck.com/content/articles/article/198/41221/
Background image of page 2
3 in this thought. It also mentions how the sentiment continues today, ninety years after the war. Therefore, the debate certainly exists that Wilson was rash in his decision to enter World War I. However, not enough attention is given to what Wilson actually said. Actions speak louder than words, but for Wilson, his actions were simply a follow through of his words. The most obvious document where Wilson spoke about the United States entering World War I is obviously in his speech to congress, “The Call to War.” Wilson mentioned that, “American ships have been sunk, American lives taken.” 2 These and multiple other actions that Wilson lists are all in the past tense which mans that these actions had been occurring for some
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 16

Wilson and World War I - 1 Eventual Participation in World...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online