c101_f10_1101 - Solutions and concentration Solution: a...

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Solutions and concentration Solution : a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances. Example: water, sugar, flavor mixture (Coke). The substances are physically combined, not chemically combined or bonded to each other. Nanoscale pictures: Figs. 5.1, 5.4, and 5.5 Solvent : usually the substance in the greater amount. The substance used to dissolve the solute or solutes. Example: water. Solute : usually the substance in the lesser amount. The substance dissolved by the solvent. Example: sugar.
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Chemistry 101 Fall 2010 2 Concentration : the ratio of the amount of solute to the total amount of solution. Examples: 80 proof alcohol, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 12 M HCl. In chemistry, we use molarity (M) because it’s based on moles and the mole ratio concept (Chapters 3 and 4). Molarity = moles of solute = mol = M Volume of solution L M = [ ] Example : What is the molarity of a sugar solution of 3.42 g sugar dissolved in a total volume of 100* mL? Sugar = C 12 H 22 O 11 = 342 g/mol. M sugar = [C 12 H 22 O 11 ] = ?
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Chemistry 101 Fall 2010 3 Example : Titration to reach equivalence point. Remember for titration that …
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This note was uploaded on 03/05/2011 for the course CHEM 101 taught by Professor Scottnickolaisen during the Fall '11 term at California State University Los Angeles .

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c101_f10_1101 - Solutions and concentration Solution: a...

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