c103-sp10-0510

c103-sp10-0510 - Chemistry 103 Spring 2010 Today 1. Gibbs...

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Unformatted text preview: Chemistry 103 Spring 2010 Today 1. Gibbs free energy and equilibrium 2. Leftovers. Announcements 1. Ch. 14-17 OWL homework is active. 2. Next midterm exam on Wednesday, May 19. Chapter 16 and Chapter 17 (note 17.8-17.10 are mostly ideas) 3. CSULA closure on May 21 (furlough). 4. CSULA closure on May 31 (holiday). 5. Bring textbook and calculator to each lecture. Chemistry 103 Spring 2010 2 Review The free energy of the universe is constantly being dispersed and decreasing as the entropy of the universe is constantly increasing. Processes that decrease free energy ( G system < 0) are favored because they increase the entropy of the universe: G system = -T S universe by definition. G system < 0 (decrease) => S universe > 0 (increase) Algebraically re-arranging this definition yields: G system = H system T S system , where all variables are in terms of the system (the process or reaction). What conditions favor G system < 0? H system S system G system < 0 (exothermic) + (increase) always (exothermic) (decrease) low T + (endothermic) + (increase) high T + (endothermic) (increase) never See Table 17.2 and Fig. 17. 7 for the effect of T. Chemistry 103 Spring 2010 3 Effect of temperature on free energy change Example : melting of ice at high vs. low T Calculate the standard free energy change for the melting of ice at 25 C and at -10 C. Do the values make sense? Fig. 17.7 shows a specific temperature at which G goes from positive (process is not favored) to negative (process is favored). Chemistry 103 Spring 2010 4 Example : Calculate the minimum temperature at which the melting of ice is favored. Chemistry 103 Spring 2010 5 Practice : Calculate the temperature at which 2CO(g) + O 2 (g) 2CO 2 (g) becomes favored....
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c103-sp10-0510 - Chemistry 103 Spring 2010 Today 1. Gibbs...

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