2nd half NOTES

2nd half NOTES - 02/11 Public Communication and persuasion...

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02/11 Public Communication and persuasion Public communication -one speaker (or panel) to an audience -types -informative speaking (e.g., formal education, training seminars, company presentations) -motivational speaking (e.g., sermons, self-help) -persuasive speaking (e.g., political speeches, TV/radio “punditry”- analysis of what is happening) what makes persuasion effective? -some important factors: -the source(s) -who or what is delivering the message? (e.g., expert, mom, celebrity spokesperson) -the message(s) -what strategies or appeals are being used? (e.g., humor, fear, evidence) -the audience(s) -who is listening/watching? Source characteristics -credibility -two different dimensions: -expertise =amount of training, knowledge, experience that source has on topic -trustworthiness =how honest or unbiased the source is perceived to be -The “Sleeper effect” -impact of credibility fades over time -we tend to forget where we get information -ex: negative campaign ads -remember neg. info., forget it was “biased” source -if reminded of source later, credibility factors comes back -similarity -shared characteristics between source and receiver -(e.g., attitude, morality, background, appearance) Source characteristics (cont.)
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-likeability -we believe what someone says if we like them -physical attractiveness -celebrity? -style of delivery (especially for speeches) effective delivery -appears “natural” -reinforces (not distracts from) message -is varied (not monotonous) -demonstrate immediacy -what helps? -preparation & rehearsal -effective notes 02/16 Public Communication and persuasion (continued): Message strategies -use of evidence (supporting arguments) -factual statements -statistics or study findings -testimonial or eyewitness reports (story about yourself/other person) -quotations -examples -analogies and metaphors -one-sided or two-sided arguments -present own side only, or present both and attack opposing view -one-sided better if: -audience agrees/leaning toward you already -not too much controversy -low familiarity with the issue -two-sided better if: -audience disagrees -controversial -high familiarity -positive emotional appeals -use vivid messages designed to arouse good feelings -ex: humor, joy, love, sentimentality, hope
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-effective if it can “condition” a response (pair the good feelings with the argument/product) -potential problem in ads: “vampire creativity” -ex: people remember the ad but forget the product -negative emotional appeals -designed to arouse unpleasant feelings -ex: guilt/shame, sadness -the “fear appeal” -basic human needs threatened -ex: safety, personal relationships -most effective when audience sees: -threat is serious -threat is likely to happen to them -specific steps toward off threat 02/18 Public Communication and persuasion (continued): -use of narrative -see how everything plays out -people have better memory for stories -songs are useful -make sure people get the point -appeals to higher- order human needs -social status (e.g., “snob” appeal) -being “normal” (e.g., “plain folks” or “anti-snob”)
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This note was uploaded on 03/07/2011 for the course SOCIOLOGY 1 taught by Professor Mullin during the Spring '11 term at UCSB.

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2nd half NOTES - 02/11 Public Communication and persuasion...

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