Hamlet 2 - Cory Baker 12/01/10 WED @ 6PM Handout for Hamlet...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cory Baker 12/01/10 WED @ 6PM Handout for Hamlet Section 2 (IV.vii.164-181): John Millais’ famous painting of the scene Ophelia, is a good representation of Gertrude’s speech. The painting is a good visual aid to the scene because this actual scene depicted is not seen onstage, but exists only in Gertrude's description. Ophelia has fallen into the river from a tree overhanging it, while gathering flowers. She lies in the water singing songs, as if unaware of her danger, "incapable of her own distress" (line 177). "Her clothes spread wide, / And, mermaid-like, awhile they bore her up" (Line 173-4). Her clothes , trapping air, have allowed her to temporarily stay afloat, but eventually, "her garments, heavy with their drink, / Pulled the poor wretch from her melodious lay" down "to muddy death" (Lines 179-181). As a reader or audience member, we derive different images of this scene. With a mythical sense, the artifacts and elements of nature represent Flora, the goddess of flowers. The speech can also represent a flora, which
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

Hamlet 2 - Cory Baker 12/01/10 WED @ 6PM Handout for Hamlet...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online