Semester 2 Chapter 6 Study Guide

Semester 2 Chapter 6 Study Guide - SEMESTER 2 Chapter 6...

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SEMESTER 2 Chapter 6 VLSM and CIDR V 4.0 6.1.1 Why were VLSM, CIDR, NAT, and private addressing developed? Without the introduction of VLSM and CIDR notation in 1993 (RFC 1519), Network Address Translator (NAT) in 1994 (RFC 1631), and private addressing in 1996 (RFC 1918), the IPv4 32-bit address space would now be exhausted. 6.1.1.2 What is the range for Class A addresses? 0.0.0.0 to 127.255.255.255 What is the range for Class B addresses? 128.0.0.0 to 191.255.255.255 What is the range for Class C addresses? 192.0.0.0 to 223.255.255.255 What are ip addresses that begin with 4 1 bits reserved for? IP addresses that begin with four 1 bits were reserved for future use. 6.1.1.3 How many hosts are available for Class C addresses? 254 6.1.2 How can you determine the subnet mask for a classful ip address? Using classful IP addresses meant that the subnet mask of a network address could be determined by the value of the first octet, or more accurately, the first three bits of the address. 6.1.3
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Semester 2 Chapter 6 Study Guide - SEMESTER 2 Chapter 6...

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