chapter7 - ProblemsandApplications

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Problems and Applications 1. Figure 13 shows supply and demand curves for haircuts. Supply equals demand at a quantity  of three haircuts and a price between $4 and $5. Firms A, C, and D should cut the hair of Ellen,  Jerry, and Phil. Oprah’s willingness to pay is too low and firm B’s costs are too high, so they do  not participate. The maximum total surplus is the area between the demand and supply curves,  which totals $11 ($8 value minus $2 cost for the first haircut, plus $7 value minus $3 cost for the  second, plus $5 value minus $4 cost for the third). 2. a. Bert’s demand schedule is: Bert’s demand curve is shown in Figure 9.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
b. When the price of a bottle of water is $4, Bert buys two bottles of water. His consumer surplus  is shown as area A in the figure. He values his first bottle of water at $7, but pays only $4 for it, so  has consumer surplus of $3. He values his second bottle of water surplus is $3 + $1 = $4, which  is the area of A in the figure. c. When the price of a bottle of water falls from $4 to $2, Bert buys three bottles of water, an  increase of one. His consumer surplus consists of both areas A and B in the figure, an increase in  the amount of area B. He gets consumer surplus of $5 from the first bottle ($7 value minus $2  price), $3 from the second bottle ($5 value minus $2 price), and $1 from the third bottle ($3 value  minus $2 price), for a total consumer surplus of $9. Thus consumer surplus rises by $5 (which is  the size of area B) when the price of a bottle of water falls from $4 to $2. 3. a. The effect of falling production costs in the market for stereos results in a shift to the right in  the supply curve, as shown in Figure 11. As a result, the equilibrium price of stereos declines and  the equilibrium quantity increases.
Background image of page 2
b. The decline in the price of stereos increases consumer surplus from area A to A + B + C + D,  an increase in the amount B + C + D. Prior to the shift in supply, producer surplus was areas B +  E (the area above the supply curve and below the price). After the shift in supply, producer  surplus is areas E + F + G. So producer surplus changes by the amount F + G – B, which may be  positive or negative. The increase in quantity increases producer surplus, while the decline in the  price reduces producer surplus. Because consumer surplus rises by B + C + D and producer  surplus rises by F + G – B, total surplus rises by C + D + F + G. c. If the supply of stereos is very elastic, then the shift of the supply curve benefits consumers 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 10

chapter7 - ProblemsandApplications

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online