Lect2_+Science

Lect2_+Science - Announcements Why does life need...

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1 Why does life need information? Day2 – Bis2A Announcements • “Achieving Deeper Learning” – an online assignment (google docs) – Link on Smartsite – Worth 20 points, due Wed by midnight – Relevant articles (2) are posted in Resources on Smartsite – Over 170 of you have already completed this assignment! • Smartsite quiz – About 430 of you completed the first quiz Central Question for Bis2-series: How did life on Earth originate? And why did it develop as it has since then? Unit 1 Question To what extent is DNA destiny? Starting point: Why does life require inherited Information? First clicker question … • If you’ve a clicker, be sure it’s on and has joined the class • Your ID number needs to be correctly entered, also • Don’t know how to run the clicker? Ask your neighbor … • Or see clickers_101 on the class website (before Wednesday!)
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2 • What does inherited information do, (directly)? – A. Allows construction of a cell from non- living starting materials. – B. Provides instructions for constructing proteins. – C. Tells a cell what to do, and when, like a brain does for a body. Case Study: Sickle-cell Anemia • Sickle-cell Anemia is a disease that affects the entire body. • Symptoms include physical weakness, pain, organ damage, and even paralysis. • Symptoms become worse when the oxygen content of an affected individual is low, such as when that person is at high altitude or performing aerobic exercise. Case Study: Sickle-cell Anemia • Regular blood transfusions can ward off brain damage and other symptoms, but there is no cure. • The disease affects one out of 400 African Americans. • The disease is heritable. • People with the disease have an altered form of a protein called hemoglobin. Case Study: Sickle-cell Anemia The oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecules in red blood cells are observed to aggregate (clump) into long rods when observed under a microscope. Sickle-cell anemia • Modern conclusion: • Sickle-cell anemia is an inherited disease caused by a single malformed protein • How can one (type of) protein have such a huge affect? What allows a protein to do its job? • Brainstorm – talk with your neighbors for a few minutes, and attempt to answer this question. • Consider: – What is a protein made of? – How does it get its shape? – Is its shape important?
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3 What allows a protein to do its job? • What is a protein made of?
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Lect2_+Science - Announcements Why does life need...

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