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Lect2_+Science - Announcements Why does life need...

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1 Why does life need information? Day2 – Bis2A Announcements “Achieving Deeper Learning” – an online assignment (google docs) – Link on Smartsite – Worth 20 points, due Wed by midnight – Relevant articles (2) are posted in Resources on Smartsite – Over 170 of you have already completed this assignment! • Smartsite quiz – About 430 of you completed the first quiz Central Question for Bis2-series: How did life on Earth originate? And why did it develop as it has since then? Unit 1 Question To what extent is DNA destiny? Starting point: Why does life require inherited Information? First clicker question … If you’ve a clicker, be sure it’s on and has joined the class Your ID number needs to be correctly entered, also Don’t know how to run the clicker? Ask your neighbor … Or see clickers_101 on the class website (before Wednesday!)
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2 What does inherited information do, (directly)? – A. Allows construction of a cell from non- living starting materials. – B. Provides instructions for constructing proteins. – C. Tells a cell what to do, and when, like a brain does for a body. Case Study: Sickle-cell Anemia Sickle-cell Anemia is a disease that affects the entire body. Symptoms include physical weakness, pain, organ damage, and even paralysis. Symptoms become worse when the oxygen content of an affected individual is low, such as when that person is at high altitude or performing aerobic exercise. Case Study: Sickle-cell Anemia Regular blood transfusions can ward off brain damage and other symptoms, but there is no cure. The disease affects one out of 400 African Americans. The disease is heritable. People with the disease have an altered form of a protein called hemoglobin. Case Study: Sickle-cell Anemia The oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecules in red blood cells are observed to aggregate (clump) into long rods when observed under a microscope. Sickle-cell anemia Modern conclusion: Sickle-cell anemia is an inherited disease caused by a single malformed protein How can one (type of) protein have such a huge affect? What allows a protein to do its job? Brainstorm – talk with your neighbors for a few minutes, and attempt to answer this question. • Consider: – What is a protein made of? – How does it get its shape? – Is its shape important?
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