Huntley_Experiment 1

Huntley_Experiment 1 - Experiment 1: Determine of MW of PEG...

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Experiment 1: Determine of MW of PEG by Intrinsic Viscosity Measurements Experiment 1: Determination of Molecular Weight of PEG by Intrinsic Viscosity Measurements Author: Michelle Huntley Group 2 Section 2, T 11:00 AM- 2:00 PM Partner: Grant Robertson 2/8/2011 Abstract : The following lab report discusses Experiment 1 of CH 340 at Clemson University. The experiment is entitled “Determination of Molecular Weight of PEG by Intrinsic Viscosity Measurements.” The experiment required the use of an Ostwald Capillary Viscosimeter. Additionally, in analyzing the data, it was required to study the Huggins equation and Mark-Houwink equation. The goal of the experiment was to find the average molecular weight of a sample of polyethylene glycol by analyzing the viscosity of multiple samples with varying concentration of polyethylene glycol in a solution of water. This report includes an introduction on viscosity measurements, data and figures created for the experiment, sample calculations for analysis and an analysis discussion. Huntley Page 1 2/22/2011
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Experiment 1: Determine of MW of PEG by Intrinsic Viscosity Measurements I. Introduction Experiment 1 of CH 340 at Clemson University utilizes the Ostwald capillary viscosimeter to determine the molecular weight of a given polymer using viscosity measuring techniques. This experiment deals with polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG is a linear chain polymer. The chemical composition of the monomer subunits and the molecular weight distribution are the two most important characteristics of linear chain polymers. The molecular weight of a given polymer can vary from sample to sample around an average value. Synthesis and processing of a polymer will affect its molecular weight distribution, meaning that one must determine a given polymer’s molecular weight experimentally. A variety of experimental techniques can be used to define molecular weight and
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This note was uploaded on 03/08/2011 for the course CHEM 232 taught by Professor James during the Spring '11 term at Clemson.

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Huntley_Experiment 1 - Experiment 1: Determine of MW of PEG...

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