Lecture+Three - Lecture Three Basic Nutrition Fitness Good...

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Lecture Three Basic Nutrition
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Fitness? Good nutrition Regular physical exercise Rest Manage stress Avoidance of harmful substances and activities (smoking, lack of seat belt use)
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Food for fitness Nutrition is the way food nourishes the body Depends upon getting enough nutrients the body needs, without excess
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Food choices Life is full of choices What is health? Fit? Physical, emotional, and mental Energy to be productive Stamina and a positive outlook Reduced risk for disease, such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis Physical strength and endurance to protect yourself in case of an emergency Better chance for a higher quality of life (perhaps longer)
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Food Consumption in U.S. Americans have made changes in their diets in response to increased awareness that diet may affect incidence of chronic disease. Public opinion is shifting, somewhat, with consumers altering food purchasing priorities to palatability as first and nutrition second obesity
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“the American epidemic” Obesity
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Obesity of U.S. Adults--1985
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1990
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1995
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2000
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2001
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2004
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2007 Source:  CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System . Obesity Trends*  Am ong U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2 0 0 7 ( * BMI  ? 3 0 , or ~  3 0  lbs. overw eight for 5 ’ 4 ” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ?30%
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2010
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Are you overweight? Take this simple medical test to find out: “Stand with your arms hanging by your sides and your feet slightly apart. Now look out the window. If you see the United States of America, then you are overweight, because everybody here is. That’s why your arms are hanging by your sides at a 45-degree angle.” Dave Barry, humorist
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Factors Contributing to Weight Gain Unhealthy Lifestyle Increased calories Increased portion sizes Increased intake of sweetened beverages Increased snack food, fast food Increased TV, video games, use of computer Decreased exercise, gym, recess Decreased milk Decreased fruits and vegetables Lisa Hark, Ph.D., R.D.
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Nutrition is The study of food and the way the body uses food. Does the food consumed provide all nutrients required for energy, growth, maintenance, and repair of body tissues?
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A nutrient is An identified component of food which the body uses for a specific metabolic process.
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A Calorie A unit of heat measurement, it is the amount of heat needed to raise 1 kilogram of water, 1 degree centigrade.
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The nutrients 1. Carbohydrate 2. Protein 3. Fat 4. Vitamins 5. Minerals 6. water
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