{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

HRFinal - 14:25 EEOlegislation,Civil RightsAct...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
14:25 EEO legislation, Civil  Rights Act GINA – Genetic Information Disparate impact, treatment, adverse impact Pregnancy Discrimination Immigration Reform & Control Act Civil Rights Act of 1991  Understanding the Legal and Environmental Context of HRM 2-1a: Equal Employment Opportunity
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
As part of Lyndon Johnson's attempt in the 1960s to create the "Great Society,"  Congress passed an avalanche of legislation aimed at ensuring  equal   employment opportunity (EEO)  in the workplace. These laws were specifically  designed to eradicate certain types of employment discrimination that had been  all too common–discrimination based on race, color, sex, religion, national origin,  age, and disability. These categories are referred to as  protected classifications   because they are protected from discrimination by EEO laws. Subcategories of  people within each protected classification are referred to as  protected groups . For example, "male" and "female" are the protected groups within the  protected classification of "sex." EEO legislation affords protection to all protected groups within a protected  classification, not just the minority groups. Thus, discrimination aimed at a man is  just as unlawful as that aimed at a woman. The lone exception to this rule  concerns the use of affirmative action programs, which, under certain  circumstances, allow employers to treat members of certain protected groups  preferentially. We discuss this issue later in the chapter. EEO Laws
Background image of page 2
The major EEO laws are summarized in Exhibit 2-1. Each prohibits discrimination  based on an individual's protected classification. These laws differ from one  another primarily in terms of the specific protected classifications covered. Exhibit 2-1. EEO Laws Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) Title VII of the  Civil Rights Act (CRA) of 1964  covers organizations that employ  15 or more workers for at least 20 weeks during the year. This law prohibits  discrimination that is based on the protected classifications of race, color,  religion, national origin, and sex. Specifically, the law states that: ce for an employer to fail or refuse to hire or discharge any individual, or otherwise to discriminate against any individ t, because of such individual's race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The CRA of 1964 is probably the most valuable tool that employees have for  remedying workplace discrimination because it covers the greatest number of  protected classifications. If a court determines that discrimination has occurred,  the victim is entitled to relief in the form of legal costs and back pay (i.e., the  salary the person would have been receiving had no discrimination occurred). 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}