Doncouse_Jeremy_Week9

Doncouse_Jeremy_Week9 - Running head: Chapter 9 1 Week 9...

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Running head: Chapter 9 1 Week 9 Written Assignment: Chapter 9 Jeremy Doncouse Mountain State University
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Running head: Chapter 9 2 Chapter 9: Muscles and Muscle Tissue Overview of muscle Tissues 1. Compare and contrast the basic types of muscle tissue. There are three basic types of muscle tissue: skeletal, cardiac, and smooth. Skeletal muscle tissue attaches to the bony skeleton these cells are the longest muscle cells and include striations. Known as a voluntary muscle, it is responsible for body mobility, exerts a lot of strength, is adaptable, and tires easily. Cardiac muscle tissue is found only in the heart and makes up its walls. The cells are striated but are involuntary because they are controlled by the nervous system. Smooth muscle tissue is found in the walls of hollow visceral organs where it forces fluids and other substances through internal body channels. The cells are elongated but lack striations and are not voluntary. Skeletal Muscle 1. Describe the gross structure of skeletal muscle. Generally, each muscle is served by one nerve that controls its activity, an artery that supplies nutrients, and one or more veins that remove waste. Connective tissue sheaths are continuous with one another and transmit the pulling force of each muscle to the bone. Each intact muscle fiber is wrapped and held together by different types of connective tissue sheaths. Epimysium is an overcoat of dense irregular connective tissue that surrounds whole muscle. Perimysium surrounds groups of muscle fibers bundled into fascicles. Endomysium is a whispy sheath of connective tissue made of fine areolar connective tissue that surrounds each muscle fiber. Most skeletal muscles attach to bones in at least two places in the insertion, the moveable bone, and the origin, the immovable bone. Attachments may be direct or indirect. Direct attachments are
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Running head: Chapter 9 3 where the epimysium is fused to the periosteum. Indirect attachments are those where the muscle’s connective tissue wrappings extend beyond the muscle as a tendon or aponeurosis. 2.
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This note was uploaded on 03/08/2011 for the course BIO 215 taught by Professor Amirafshar during the Fall '10 term at Mountain State.

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Doncouse_Jeremy_Week9 - Running head: Chapter 9 1 Week 9...

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