Chapter+22+ElectrostaticsLNstudent

Chapter+22+ElectrostaticsLNstudent - Chapter 22 Conceptual...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 22 – Conceptual Physics II MOUNT Chapter 22 Electrostatics Chapter Objectives : Describe electrical forces between objects. Explain how an object becomes (a) positively charged and (b) negatively charged. Describe Coulomb's law. Distinguish between a conductor and an insulator. Describe how an insulator can be charged by friction and by contact. Describe how a conductor can be charged without contact. Describe how an insulator can be charged by charge polarization. Chapter Terms: electricity electrostatics conservation of charge coulomb's law couloumb conductor insulator electrically polarized electric field electric potential energy electric potential capacitor Chapter Formulas: Voltage = electric potential energy/amount of charge Chapter Outline Framework: Electrical Forces Electric Charges Conservation of charge Coulomb's Law Conductors and Insulators o Semiconductors o Superconductors Charging o Charging by Friction and Contact o Charging by Induction Charge Polarization Electric Field o Electric Shielding Electric Potential Electric Energy Source Van de Graaff Generator
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 22 – Conceptual Physics II MOUNT What is stuff composed of? What is the structure of material objects? Is there a basic unit from which all objects are made? As early as 400 B.C., some Greek philosophers proposed that matter is made of indivisible building blocks known as atomos . ( Atomos in Greek means indivisible.) From the 1600s to the present century, the search for the atom became an experimental pursuit. Several scientists are notable; among them are Robert Boyle, John Dalton, J.J. Thomson, Ernest Rutherford, and Neils Bohr. English scientist J.J. Thomson's cathode ray experiments (end of the 19th century) led to the discovery of the negatively-charged electron and the first ideas of the structure of these indivisible atoms. Ernest Rutherford's famous gold foil experiments led to the nuclear model of atomic structure. Rutherford's model suggested that the atom consisted of a densely packed core of positive charge known as the nucleus surrounded by negatively-charged electrons. Neils Bohr (1913) improved upon Rutherford's nuclear model by explaining that the electrons present were present in orbits outside the nucleus. The electrons were confined to specific orbits of fixed radius, each characterized by their own discrete levels of energy. While electrons could be forced from one orbit to another orbit, it could never occupy the space between orbits. The three main subatomic particles are:
Background image of page 2
Chapter 22 – Conceptual Physics II MOUNT Summary of Subatomic Particles Proton Neutron Electron In nucleus Tightly Bound Positive Charge Massive In nucleus Tightly Bound No Charge Massive Outside nucleus Weakly Bound Negative Charge Not very massive Charge The number of electrons which surround the nucleus will determine whether or not an atom is
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/08/2011 for the course PHYS 1251 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at North Texas.

Page1 / 18

Chapter+22+ElectrostaticsLNstudent - Chapter 22 Conceptual...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online