ANS52(1)29-31 - ACTIVITAS NERVOSA SUPERIOR Activitas...

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Activitas Nervosa Superior 2010; 52 :1,29-31 29 S OMATOFORM DISSOCIATION AND SYMPTOMS OF TRAUMATIC STRESS IN ADOLESCENTS Lubomir Kukla*, Petra Selesova, Petr Okrajek, Jan Tulak Research Institute of Preventive and Social Paediatrics, Medical Faculty, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic Received January 10, 2010; accepted February 4, 2010 Abstract Dissociation is traditionally attributed to trauma and other psychological stressors although there is evidence that in many cases dissociative symptoms could be attributable to initial brain insult, injury or other organic brain disease. With re- spect to these findings there is a question to which extent symptoms of somatoform dissociation are related to symptoms of traumatic stress or whether these symptoms may be predominantly attributed to various somatic factors. With this aim we have assessed the relationship between somatoform dissociation and symptoms of traumatic stress in a group of 75 healthy adolescents. Main result of this study indicates statistically significant relationship between somatoform dissocia- tive symptoms and psychosocial stressors measured by symptoms of traumatic stress. Results of this study also show that the symptoms of somatoform dissociation may occur continuously in population and that only in high level of their expe- rience they cause psychopathological states. In this context, result of this study suggests that also mild levels of stress influence somatic feelings that may lead to symptoms that may occur also as a consequence of various somatic factors. Key words: Adolescents; Dissociation; Somatoform dissociation; Stress INTRODUCTION Dissociation is traditionally attributed to trauma and other psychological stressors that are linked to disso- ciated traumatic memories (Bob, 2003, 2007; Kihlstrom, 2005; Spiegel, 1997). Nevertheless there is evidence that in many cases dissociative symptoms could be attributable to initial brain insult, injury or other organic brain disease (Kihlstrom, 2005; Spiegel, 1997). This is in agreement with historical and recent findings suggesting that also somatic components of dissociation leading to a lack of integration of somatoform compo- nents of experience, reactions, and functions may have a profound role (Nijenhuis, 2000; Nijenhuis et al., 1996; Bob 2008). Historically are these pathological manife- stations associated with systematic descriptions per- formed in 1859 by Pierre Briquet and later comprehen- sively studied by Pierre Janet, who studied mental and somatic factors as closely connected and understood
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This note was uploaded on 03/08/2011 for the course CLINICAL P 2010 taught by Professor Actnervsuper during the Spring '11 term at The Chicago School of Prof. Psychology.

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ANS52(1)29-31 - ACTIVITAS NERVOSA SUPERIOR Activitas...

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