20132014hscurriculumguide.pdf - High School Physical Education Curriculum Guide Acknowledgements The following have contributed to the successful

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Unformatted text preview: High School Physical Education Curriculum Guide Acknowledgements The following have contributed to the successful completion of the Omaha Public Schools High School Physical Education Guide: Omaha Public Schools Board of Education (July 2013) Justin T. Wayne, President Lou Ann Goding, Vice President Sarah Brumfield Marian Fey Lacey Merica Matt Scanlan Marque A. Snow Katie L. Underwood Yolanda R. Williams Mark A. Evans Superintendent Physical Education and Athletics Omaha Public Schools Committee Members Aja Wurth-Jefferson Chad Townsend-Central Kate McClain-Rose Hill Meredith Kinman-Central Kippy King-Spring Lake Lisa Studer-Central Elizabeth Pittacle-Joslyn Candi Hughes-Burke Shanda Dominguez-Bancroft Mary Buresh-Bryan Colette Christianson-Gomez Heritage Brett Schnabel-North Denise Knight-Monroe Kathy Porter-Benson Sarah Rittenhouse-Marrs Magnet Dennis Baker-Central Justin Thomalla-Marrs Magnet Renee Saunders-South Kevin Moon-King Science Magnet Shannen Peterson-Bryan Middle Jeanie Weiss-Teacher Administrative Center Dr. Mike Messerole-University of Nebraska at Omaha, Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Dr. Peg Naylon-Coordinator of Physical Education and Athletics Bob Danenhauer-Supervisor of Physical Education and Athletics 2 Table of Contents: Philosophy, Vision, Mission and Purpose Statement …………………………………………………….4 Physical Education Standards.……..……………………………………………………………..…… 5-10 Establishing an Effective Classroom……………………………………………………………….…11-14 Wellness Themes……………..……………………………………………………………………… 15-27 Fitness Testing…………………………..…………………………………………………………… 28-31 High School Courses Offered and Course Descriptions……………………………………………... 32-34 Course Outcomes for Content Standards………...………………………………………………….. 35-38 Scope and Sequence for Classes and Activities………...…………………………………………… 39-43 Unit Components…………………………………………………………………………………….. 44-45 Assessment Tools…………………………….……………………………………………………… 46-53 Potential Units of Study…….…………………………………………………………………...….. 54-58 Team Sports Materials…………………………………………………………………………….…59-121 Lifetime Sports Materials…………………………………………………………………………..122-174 Aquatics Materials…………………………………………………………………………….……175-189 Aerobics Materials……………………………………………………………………………….…190-209 Weight Training Materials………………………………………………………………………….210-219 General PE Materials…………………………………………………………………………….….220-225 Fit Club Materials…………………………..……………………………………………………….226-228 People of Reference……………………….…………………………………………………………..…229 Website Resources……………..…………………………………………………………………….….230 Book Resources………………………………………………...............................................................231 3 Our Philosophy… It is the goal of the Omaha Public Schools physical education program to provide students with developmentally appropriate learning opportunities with meaningful content and instruction. All students will develop health-related fitness, physical competence, cognitive understanding and positive attitudes about physical activity that promotes a healthy and physically active lifestyle. Our Vision Statement… Inspire every student to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Our Mission Statement… Physical Education instructors believe that physical education is essential to the education of the whole child. The physical education program provides opportunities for students to attain the skills, knowledge and attitudes essential for a healthy lifestyle. Our High School Physical Education Purpose… To introduce our students to a variety of wellness related activities so that they have the ability to develop a physically active lifestyle for a lifetime. 4 Physical Education Content Standards *Taken from National Association for Sport and Physical Education. (2004). Moving into the Future: National Standards for physical Education (2nd ed.). Reston, VA: Author Definition: Content standards specify “what students should know and be able to do”. They include the knowledge and skills—the ways of thinking, communicating, reasoning, and investigating, and the most important enduring ideas, concepts, issues, dilemmas, and information that characterize each discipline. In effect, they involve the knowledge and skills essential to a discipline that students are expected to learn Content Standard 01: Demonstrates a variety of physical skills through movement activities. The intent of this standard is development of the movement/physical skills needed to enjoy participation in physical activities. Mastering movement fundamentals establishes a foundation to facilitate continued motor skill acquisition and gives students the capacity for successful and advanced levels of performance to further the likelihood of participation on a daily basis. In the primary years, students develop maturity and versatility in the use of fundamental skills (e.g., running, skipping, throwing, striking) that are further refined, combined and varied during the middle school years. These motor patterns, now having evolved into specialized skills (e.g., a specific dance step, chest pass, catching with a glove) are used in increasingly more complex movement environments (e.g., more players or participants, rules and strategies) through the middle school years. On the basis of interest and ability, high school students select a few activities for regular participation within which more advanced skills are mastered. In preparation for adulthood, students acquire the basic skills to participate in a wide variety of leisure and work-related physical activities. 5 Content Standard 02: Applies movement concepts and principles to develop physical skills. The intent of this standard is to facilitate the ability of the learner to use cognitive information to understand and enhance motor skill acquisition and performance. This includes the application of concepts from disciplines such as motor learning and development, sport psychology and sociology, and biomechanics and exercise physiology. For example, concepts like increasing force production through the summation of forces, the effects of anxiety on performance, and the principle of specificity of training. Knowledge of these concepts and practices and applying them enhances the likelihood of independent learning and therefore more regular and effective participation in physical activity. In the lower elementary grades, emphasis is placed on establishing a movement vocabulary and initial application of introductory concepts (e.g., application of force). Through the upper elementary and middle school years, an emphasis is placed on applying and generalizing these concepts to real- life physical activity situations (e.g., managing stress, effect of growth spurt on movement performance). In high school, emphasis is placed on students independently and routinely using a wide variety of increasingly complex concepts (e.g., performance trends associated with learning new motor skills). By graduation, the student develops a sufficient knowledge and ability to independently use their knowledge to acquire new skills while continuing to refine existing ones. 6 Content Standard 03: Participates regularly in and understands the benefits of a physically active lifestyle. The intent of this standard is for students to establish patterns of regular participation in meaningful physical activity. This standard connects what is done in the physical education class with the lives of students outside of the classroom. While participation within the physical education class is important, what the student does outside the physical education class is critical to developing an active, healthy lifestyle that could help prevent a variety of health problems among future generations of adults. Students make use of the skills and knowledge learned in physical education class as they engage in regular physical activity outside of the physical education class. Understanding develops from an initial awareness of cause and effect relationships between activity and its immediate and identifiable effects on the body to an increased understanding of the role of physical activity on the physical and psychological health of the body, social opportunities and relationships, and quality of life. Students are more likely to participate if they have had opportunities to develop interests that are personally meaningful to them. Young children learn to enjoy physical activity, yet also learn that a certain level of personal commitment and work is required to reap the benefits from their participation. They partake in developmentally appropriate activities that help them develop movement competence and should be encouraged to participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity and unstructured play. As students get older the structure of activity tends to increase and the opportunities for participation in different types of activity increase outside of the physical education class. Attainment of this standard encourages participation commensurate with contemporary recommendations regarding the type of activity as well as the frequency, duration, and intensity of participation believed to promote a healthy lifestyle. 7 Content Standard 04: Assess and adjusts goals to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness. The intent of this standard is for students to have both the ability and willingness to accept responsibility for personal fitness leading to an active, health lifestyle. Students develop higher levels of basic fitness and physical competence as needed for many work situations and active leisure participation. Health-related fitness components include cardio respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Expectations for students’ fitness levels are established on a personal basis, taking into account variation in entry levels, rather than setting a single standard for all children at a given grade level or comparing one student to another. Students progress in their ability to participate in moderate to vigorous physical activities that address each component of health-related fitness. Moreover, students become more skilled in their ability to plan, perform, and monitor physical activities appropriate for developing physical fitness. For elementary children, the emphasis is on an awareness of fitness components and having fun while participating in health-enhancing activities that promote physical fitness. Middle school students gradually acquire a greater understanding of the fitness components, how each is developed and maintained, and the importance of each in overall fitness. Secondary students are able to design and develop an appropriate personal fitness program that enables them to achieve desired levels of fitness. 8 Content Standard 05: Demonstrates responsible personal and social behavior during physical activities. The intent of this standard is achievement of self- initiated behaviors that promote personal and group success in activity settings. These include safe practices, adherence to rules and procedures, etiquette, cooperation and teamwork, ethical behavior in sport, and positive social interaction. Key to this standard is developing respect for individual similarities and differences through positive interaction among participants in physical activity. Similarities and differences include characteristics of culture, ethnicity, motor performance, disabilities, physical characteristics (e.g., strength, size, shape), gender, race, and socio-economic status. Achievement of this standard in the lower elementary grades begins with recognition of classroom rules and procedures and a focus on safety. In the upper elementary levels, children learn to work independently, with a partner, and in small groups. Throughout elementary school students begin to recognize individual similarities and differences and participate cooperatively in physical activity. In the middle school, adolescents identify the purposes for rules and procedures and become involved in decision-making processes to establish the rules and procedures to guide specific activity situations. They participate cooperatively in physical activity with persons of diverse characteristics and backgrounds. High school students initiate responsible behavior, function independently and responsibly, and positively influence the behavior of others in physical activity settings. They are expected to be able to participate with all people, recognize the value of diversity in physical activity, and develop strategies for inclusion of others. 9 Content Standard 06: Demonstrates understanding and respect for differences among people in physical activities. The intent of this standard is to develop an awareness of the intrinsic values and benefits of participation in physical activity that provides personal meaning. Physical activity provides opportunities s for self-expression and social interaction and can be enjoyable, challenging, and fun. These benefits develop self-confidence and promote positive self-image, thereby enticing people to continue participation in activity throughout the lifespan. Elementary children derive pleasure from movement sensations and experience challenge and joy as they sense a growing competence in movement ability. At the middle school level, participation in physical activity provides important opportunities for challenge, social interaction, and group membership, as well as opportunities for continued personal growth in physical skills and their applied settings. Participation at the high school level continues to provide enjoyment and challenge as well as opportunities for self-expression and social interaction. As a result of these intrinsic benefits of participation, students will begin to actively pursue lifelong physical activities that meet their own needs. 10 Establishing an Effective Classroom 11 Establishing an Effective Classroom (Text: Management and Discipline pgs. 147-173) Best Practices 1. Dress: *Acceptable shirts, shorts, shoes *Amount of time allowed at beginning and end of class *Loaner policies 2. Attendance: *Squads to expedite organization *Grade books and Infinite Campus *Tardy policy 3. Locks and Lockers: *Padlocks: Organization of combinations, locker assignments and check in/out procedures *Built-in locks (yearly combination change) *Number of students per locker 4. Showers: *Individual best practice *Towels provided *Required for swim 5. Lesson Plan Development: *Content Standards *EXCELS *Multicultural/Non sexist *Marzano *High School Strategic plan *Lesson Title *Materials *Anticipatory Set *Objectives *Procedures of Instruction *Summary 12 Rules and Procedures: 1. Emergency: (Please post in ALL areas) *Fire, Disaster, Lockdown, Evacuation *Exit routes 2. Safety: *Indoor facility conditions *Outdoor facility conditions *Locker room etiquette *Hallway transitioning *Proper equipment usage 3. Medical: *Location of AED *Location of nurse’s office *Building procedures for doctor and parent excuse notes *Location of First Aid kits *CPR certification *Asthma plan and other medical concerns (see nurse) Effective Learning Environment: 1. Introductory Activity: *Daily Objectives *Warm up (Please refer to Chapter 14 in text and lesson plan manual) 2. Fitness and Skill Development *Percent of class time for each 3. Lesson Focus and Game/Activity: *Percent of class time used Technology: 1. Gaming Systems *Nintendo Wii *PS2 Dance Dance Revolution 2. Pedometers 3. Heart Rate Monitors 4. Fitnessgram/Activitygram 5. Sound Systems 6. Audio/Video Equipment 13 Ideas for Effective Instruction: (pgs. 338 - 347) (Fitnessgram, pgs. 25-56) 1. Equipment 2. Rules 3. Parent Information Assessments: (Fitnessgram pgs. 59-68) 1. 2. 3. 4. Fitness/Exercise Rubrics Content Standard Proficiency Scales Standard One Skill Checklists/Rubrics Fitnessgram (pgs. 59-68) 14 Wellness Themes 15 Wellness Themes Cardio-Respiratory (Fitness for Life ch. 7) Covered August and September (traditional schedule) Risk factors, benefits and consequences, goal setting, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, blood pressure, target HR, resting HR, recovery HR, anaerobic, aerobic, FITT. Upper and Lower Body Strength and Endurance (Fitness for Life ch 12) Covered in October (traditional schedule) Specificity, overload, isometric, isotonic, isokinetic, progression, eccentric, concentric, FITT, set, rep, endurance, strength, overload, specificity, resistance, plyometrics, periodization, interval training, goal setting… Nutrition (Fitness for Life ch 14) Covered in November (traditional schedule) Carbohydrate loading, metabolism, calories, goal setting, labels, fluids, nutrients, saturated fat, unsaturated fat, trans fat, sugars, calories, vitamins, minerals… Body Image (Fitness for Life ch 13) Covered in December and January (traditional schedule) Lifestyle, body comp, eating disorders, weight maintenance, goal setting, heredity, skinfold, moderation, BMR, RMR, calorie, FITT, BMI, energy expenditure… Flexibility (Fitness for Life ch. 10) Covered in February (traditional schedule) Methods, progression, specificity, joint flexion and extension, static, dynamic, goal setting, ROM, injury prevention, FITT, ballistic, joint laxity, overload, PNF, hyper-mobility, arthritis, shin splints… 16 Consumer Issues and Exercise Myths (Fitness for Life ch 15) Covered in March (traditional schedule) Consumerism, muscular bulk vs. definition, spot reducing, fad diets, quackery, supplements, figure wrapping, health clubs, evaluation of resources, dietician, nutritionist… Fitness for Life ch 12: steroids, creatine, ephedra Stress Management (Fitness for Life ch 17) Covered in April and May (traditional schedule) Stress, general adaptation syndrome, eustress, distress, stressors (physical, emotional, social), managing stress, stress signals… 17 Sample Wellness Theme Exam 18 Name______________________ Period_________ Physical Education Wellness Theme Test Answer all questions! Good luck! Level 2 Questions: 1. All of the following are risk factors that could lead to cardio-respiratory illness or disease except: A. Inactivity B. Obesity C. Stress D. Gender E. All of these are risk factors 2. Which of the following is a benefit of cardio-respiratory fitness? A. Improved appearance B. Good PE grades C. More boy/girl- friends D. More parties 3. A short term goal is… A. Specific for a short time B. General for a short time C. Specific for a long time D. General for a long time 4. A long term goal is… A. Specific for a short time B. General for a short time C. Specific for a long time D. General for a long time 5. All A. B. C. D. of the following are goal setting steps except: Desire Set realistic goals Make a plan of action All of these are steps 6. Which is not a characteristic of muscular strength? A. 60-90 % of max B. 1-3 sets C. 5-8 reps D. 3-5 sets 7. Which is not a characteristic of muscular endurance? A. 30-50 % of max B. 1-3 sets C. 12-20 reps D. 3-5 sets 19 8. F.I.T.T. stands for frequency, intensity, time and __________: A. Typo B. Type C. Turkey D. Taco 9. Frequency is ____________ to exercise: A. How hard B. How long C. How often D. What kind 10. Intensity is _____________ to exercise: A. how hard B. how long C. how often D. what kind 11. Time is _______________ to exercise: A. How hard B. How long C. How often D. What kind 12. Progression is… A. Increasing workload gradually B. Increasing workload quickly C. Not increasing workload D. Decreasing workload 13. Isometric exercise is … A. Apply force without moving B. Contract muscles but do not move C. Apply force onto self D. All of the above 14. Leg Press exercises your: A. Quadriceps B. Gastrocnemius C. Tibialis Anterior D. Triceps 20 15. Changing calorie consumption will either __________ or __________ body weight. A. Increase/Decrease B. Nothing C. Gain/Lose D. A and C 16. BMR A. B. C. D. stand for… Best Man Remembers Basal Metabolic Rerun Basal Metabolic Rate Basal Mutant Rat 17. It is recommended that you gain or l...
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