Chapter 5 DV - Chapter 5 Computers in the Transportation...

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Chapter 5 Computers in the Transportation Industry
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2 Computers in Transportation Design, test, and manufacture vehicles Control the basic systems inside cars and trucks Provide collision warnings and safety features Provide new entertainment options for cars Design smart cars
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3 Computers in Transportation, 2 Navigate to destinations using computerized mapping, onboard GPS systems, and telematics Automate trains and buses Handle air traffic control Book airline reservations and check-in Perform pre-flight calculations Help with airline pilot training
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4 Computer-Aided Design (CAD) Designs can be modified during the process Product features can dynamically change Calculations are performed to optimize the design Many options can be created to get feedback from customers and executives Product cycle and costs are reduced In 1995, the Boeing 777 was the first airplane to be designed completely digitally; CAD was used to link 238 design teams
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5 Computer-Aided Design Examples
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6 Testing Systems Computer-aided engineering (CAE) allows for testing in the early stages of product development Reduces risks, cost, and time associated with physical testing CAE is also used for aerodynamic testing Wind tunnel testing Tubes send wind over the test object; instruments measure and record forces Virtual wind tunnel testing Uses a software program, a 3-D model, and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to simulate the effects of wind
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7 A Virtual Wind Tunnel
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8 Testing Systems, cont. Drivers and pilots use simulations to predict the performance of any vehicle under stress Computerized crash analyses can be performed with software that simulates a car crash After testing is done, computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) is used to assemble products Uses robots, CNC (Computer Numerical Control) milling machines , tooling machines
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9 An Actual Two-Vehicle Crash (seen from beneath) A Simulated Two-Vehicle Crash
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10 Inventory Control Systems Vehicle manufacturers rely on inventory control systems to track supplies and ensure adequate supplies A customized database management system tracks parts, location, cost, etc. Also stores information on collections of parts, called kits, that are needed to complete a specific job Kits have their own codes and price; their individual components can be tracked separately
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System, Hydro Nautics Corp. 11
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This note was uploaded on 03/09/2011 for the course BCIS 2610 taught by Professor Sidorova during the Fall '08 term at North Texas.

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Chapter 5 DV - Chapter 5 Computers in the Transportation...

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