Chapter 7 DV - Chapter 7 Computer Viruses and Computer...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 7 Computer Viruses and Computer Crime
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
“Computer Spies Breach Fighter-Jet Project” – WSJ , 21 April 2009 2 F-35 Lightning II
Background image of page 2
3 Introduction A computer security risk is any event or action that could cause a loss of or damage to computer hardware, software, or data Security breaches can be accidental or planned Malicious logic programs are deliberate programs that change the operation of the computer (Ex., virus, worm, Trojan horse) Computer crime covers a wide range of acts Identifying and prosecuting computer criminals is a challenge
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 Computer Viruses A potentially damaging computer program designed to infect a computer, replicate itself, and negatively affect the way a computer works Works without your knowledge or permission Can be malicious or simply a prank A virus has three main characteristics Searches for new programs, software, documents, or other files to infect Reproduces by adding itself to other files or creating copies of itself and distributing the copies Performs an unwanted function on a computer, such as destroying files, corrupting part of the hard disk, or displaying an annoying message
Background image of page 4
5 Computer Viruses, cont. Viruses can spread from one system to another Viruses attach themselves to a piece of software called a host program The virus spreads when the host program is shared or copied People who copy and keep the host software are unaware that the virus exists A virus usually attacks at the specific times or dates determined by the person who wrote the virus code Often the virus code will display a message letting you know that the virus has done its damage
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 The Green Caterpillar virus is a prank
Background image of page 6
7 Types of Viruses File viruses insert virus code into program files When the program is run, the virus spreads to any program that accesses the infected program Macro viruses use the macro language of an application (ex., Excel) to hide virus code When certain actions are taken in an infected document, the virus is activated Boot sector viruses replace the boot program used to start the computer system with an infected version (“boot sector” = special place on storage medium where BIOS looks to start the operating system)
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Types of Viruses, 2 Master boot record viruses store a copy of the master boot record in a different location so that the system cannot boot (“master boot record” = small program that starts the operating system) Multipartite viruses infect boot records and program files Very destructive and difficult to repair 8
Background image of page 8
9 The Silly Willy file virus attempts to reformat a floppy disk
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/09/2011 for the course BCIS 2610 taught by Professor Sidorova during the Fall '08 term at North Texas.

Page1 / 37

Chapter 7 DV - Chapter 7 Computer Viruses and Computer...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online