Study questions for lecture 11 (nuclear transport)

Study questions for lecture 11 (nuclear transport) - 1. The...

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1. The inner and outer nuclear membranes form a continuous sheet, connecting through nuclear pores. Continuity implies that membrane proteins can move freely between the two nuclear membranes by diffusion. Yet, the inner and outer nuclear membranes have different compositions. What mechanisms might account for this apparent paradox? 2. You generate a NLS-GFP-NES construct and transfect it into cultured cells. Under the microscope, you detect 60% of GFP in the cytoplasm and 40% GFP in the nucleus. One of your lab mates is wondering whether the addition of GFP to the NLS affects the efficient import into the nucleus and that is why you detect 60% of GFP in the cytosol. She suggests that you test this possibility by using drug that inhibits nuclear export. How would you perform the experiment and what possible outcomes do you envision? 3. RanQ69 is a mutant form of Ran that cannot hydrolyze GTP. What are the consequences of overexpressing RanQ69 in cultured cells? Assume that RanQ69 levels are overwhelmingly high and wild-type Ran is essentially abrogated. Side Note:
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This note was uploaded on 03/09/2011 for the course MCB 410 taught by Professor Ward during the Spring '08 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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Study questions for lecture 11 (nuclear transport) - 1. The...

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