econ300-problem-set-1-answers

econ300-problem-set-1-answers - Econ 300 Problem Set 1...

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Unformatted text preview: Econ 300, Problem Set 1, Suggested Answers Professor Cramton 2.1.2. (a) Yes, this is a function. It maps each x in the domain into one and only one y in the range. (b) No, this is not a function. It maps each x in the domain into more than one y. For instance, for x = 2, we can have y = 1 but also y = 0 or any other number smaller or equal to 2. (c) Yes, this is a function. It maps each x in the domain (which is restricted to the interval (0 , ∞ ) into one and only one y in the range. (d) Yes, this is a function. It maps each x in the domain into one and only one y in the range. Note however that it is not a invertible function (it is not one-to-one). (e) No, this is not a function. For any strictly positive x, we have two as- sociated y’s, while for any strictly negative x, there is no y fulfilling the condition. (f) Yes, this is a function, but we need to exclude x = 3 from its domain....
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This note was uploaded on 03/10/2011 for the course ECON 300 taught by Professor Mulligan during the Spring '10 term at Southern Maryland.

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econ300-problem-set-1-answers - Econ 300 Problem Set 1...

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