chapter 16 edited

chapter 16 edited - Evidence of Evolution Chapter 16 16.1...

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Evidence of Evolution Chapter 16
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16.1 Early Discoveries By the 19th century, advances in geology , biogeography , and comparative morphology resulted in awareness of change in lines of descent of species
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Geological Evidence
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Biogeographical Evidence
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Comparative Morphological Evidence
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Fossil Evidence
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16.2 Evolution: Development of New Theories Evolution Change that occurs in a line of descent 19th-century naturalists tried to reconcile traditional beliefs with evidence of evolution Georges Cuvier’s theory of catastrophism Lamarck’s theory of inheritance of acquired characteristics
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Voyage of the Beagle Charles Darwin’s observations on a voyage around the world led to new ideas about species Theory of uniformity (gradual, repetitive change)
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Voyage of the Beagle
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Key Concepts: EMERGENCE OF EVOLUTIONARY THOUGHT Long ago, Western scientists started to catalog previously unknown species and think about their global distribution They discovered similarities and differences among major groups, including those represented as fossils in layers of sedimentary rock
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16.3 Descent with Modification Darwin compared the modern armadillo with the extinct glyptodont
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Variations in Traits Darwin observed that variations in traits influence an individual’s ability to secure resources – to survive and reproduce
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Darwin, Wallace, and Natural Selection In 1858, Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace independently proposed a new theory, that natural selection can bring about evolution
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Theory of Natural Selection Natural selection The differential in survival and reproduction among individuals of a population that vary in details of their shared traits Can lead to increased fitness Fitness An individual’s adaptation to an environment, measured by its relative genetic contribution to future generations
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Main Premises of the Theory of Natural Selection 1. A population tends to grow until it begins to
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This note was uploaded on 03/10/2011 for the course BIOL 1409 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at Dallas Colleges.

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chapter 16 edited - Evidence of Evolution Chapter 16 16.1...

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