Chapter 2 - Chapter 2 KVANLI PAVUR KEELING Click to edit...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 3/13/11 Chapter 2 – Data Presentation Using Descriptive Graphs KVANLI PAVUR KEELING
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3/13/11 Chapter Objectives At the completion of this chapter, you should be able to answer: How does one construct (and when is it appropriate to use) each of the following graphs: a. Histogram b. Frequency polygon c. Ogive
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3/13/11 Chapter Objectives - Continued ∙ What is a frequency distribution , and how would you construct a frequency distribution from a set of data? ∙ What are some of the ways in which a
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3/13/11 Population sizes of 500 Class Number Size of City Frequency 1 Under 10,000 4 2 10,000 and under 15,000 51 3 15,000 and under 20,000 77 4 20,000 and under 25,000 105 5 25,000 and under 30,000 84 6 30,000 and under 35,000 60 7 35,000 and under 40,000 45 8 40,000 and under 45,000 38 9 45,000 and under 50,000 31 10 50,000 and over 5 500 Table 2.1
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3/13/11 Salary Data in Table 2.2
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3/13/11 Frequency Distribution for Continuous Data 41.5 39.4 40.9 35.9 37.4 39.5 40.3 39.3 41.6 36.6 41.1 35.7 43.7 37.0 41.3 40.6 38.0 42.4 35.7 41.4 39.2 36.8 39.3 43.8 38.5 43.0 36.3 35.6 36.2 38.1 34.8 38.1 35.7 36.5 39.5 37.9 34.3 36.8 33.8 35.0 37.8 38.7 37.2 32.8 38.2 37.0 39.7 38.8 35.2 36.2 Original Data 32.8 33.8 34.3 34.8 35.0 35.2 35.6 35.7 35.7 35.7 35.9 36.2 36.2 36.3 36.5 36.6 36.8 36.8 37.0 37.0 37.2 37.4 37.8 37.9 38.0 38.1 38.1 38.2 38.5 38.7 38.8 39.2 39.3 39.3 39.4 39.5 39.5 39.7 40.3 40.6 40.9 41.1 41.3 41.4 41.5 41.6 42.4 43.0 43.7 43.8 Ordered Array Table 2.3
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3/13/11 Constructing a Frequency Distribution 1. Gather the sample data 2. Arrange the data in an ordered array 3. Select the number of classes to be used 4. Determine the class width 5. Determine the class limits for each class 6. Count the number of data values in each class (the class frequencies) 7. Summarize the class frequencies in a frequency distribution table
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3/13/11 Constructing the Frequency Distribution To see what’s going on within the data, we’ll put the data into classes (groups) Let K be the number of classes Generally, K is between 5 and 20 and the larger the sample, the more classes you can use Let’s try K = 6 classes
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3/13/11 Constructing the Frequency Distribution Looking at the ordered data, the smallest value is L = 32.8 and the largest value is H = 43.8 Next, find Round (up or down) to a “nice number” Here we’ll round this to 2 83 . 1 6 8 . 32 8 . 43 = - = - K L H Other Applications ( H -L)/K Round to 11.6 10 46.5 50
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Chapter 2 - Chapter 2 KVANLI PAVUR KEELING Click to edit...

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