Jazz_PPT_ch11 (1) - Part IV Click to edit Master subtitle...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Part IV Modern Jazz © 2009 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.
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Click to edit Master subtitle style Jazz Lecture Outlines and Art Chapter 11 Bebop © 2009 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.
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§ Bebop is a turning away from jazz as a popular music, part of the mainstream of American culture, to a music that is isolated, non- danceable, and played by small combos to a small audience in a virtuosic style that is difficult to grasp (mid-1940s). § There are two ways to see this change: one is that bebop was revolutionary, something apart from the jazz that preceded it; the second is that bebop is evolutionary, part of the jazz tradition that made it into an art music. We begin with the evolutionary approach. Bebop
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Bebop and Jam Sessions Swing musicians started work in the evening and continued to play after their regular gig (engagement) at jam sessions, which were relaxing, on the one hand, in their informality, but, on the other hand, work-like in their competitiveness. Musicians kept inexperienced players off the bandstand by playing tunes at ridiculously fast tempos in an unfamiliar key. Standards like “I Got Rhythm” were re-harmonized with difficult chord substitutions. Bebop musicians were continually tested and experimented with fast tempos and complicated harmonies.
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Dropping Bombs at Minton’s § Charlie Parker and other Beboppers played jam sessions at Minton’s Playhouse on 118th Street in Manhattan, where adventurous challenge was the name of the game. § Drummer Kenny Clarke relates how he changed drumming while playing a very fast tune with Teddy Hill’s band in the 1930s. He couldn’t play every quarter-note on the bass drum so he started keeping the beat on the ride cymbal, producing a lighter, more flexible way to play time and leaving the bass drum available for fills.
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Dropping Bombs at Minton’s (cont’d) § Hill and some other swing musicians didn’t like it, feeling that the beat was too broken up, so he let Clarke go in 1940. But when his band collapsed, Minton offered him the job of running the music at his Playhouse. Hill realized that Clarke’s style of playing might be perfect for a jam session. Clarke’s combinations of snare and bass drum accents were called “klook-mop.” “Klook’” as he came to be known, played unexpected bass drum accents, which became known as dropping bombs (this all took place, after all, during World
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This note was uploaded on 03/11/2011 for the course MUSIC 3UU3 taught by Professor Gerry during the Spring '11 term at McMaster University.

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Jazz_PPT_ch11 (1) - Part IV Click to edit Master subtitle...

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