ch02_online_notes

ch02_online_notes - Chapter 2 Key concepts: • Continental...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Chapter 2 Key concepts: • Continental drift • Seafloor spreading • Convergent plate boundary • Divergent plate boundary • Transform-fault plate boundary • Why do plates move? • Magnetic anomalies • Pangaea Which force(s) create 1. Gravity 2. Electro- magnetism 3. Nuclear forces Plate Tectonics The unifying theory of the Earth sciences The outer portion of the Earth is made up of about 20 distinct “plates” (~ 100 km thick), or lithosphere which move relative to each other • This motion is what causes earthquakes and makes mountain ranges Continental Drift The concept that large-scale horizontal movements of the outer por tions of the Ear th are responsible for the major topographical features such as mountains and ocean basins. Proposed by Alfred Wegner in 1912 based on his observation of drifting sheets of ice. The topography of Mars by NASA and Venus from tes.asu.edu/ images/ SOL_SYST/ VENUS/ venus_topography.gif Venus Mars Moon topography (FROM http:/ / www.ep.sci.hokudai.ac.jp/ ~mosir/ work/ 2002/ kamokata/ lecture/ moon/ Geographic Fit of the Continents One of the first pieces of evidence used to argue for continental drift Suggested that all continents were once together in a single supercontinent called Pangea Fig. 2.1 Geology and Paleontology Matches on Opposite Sides of the Atlantic Fig. 2.2 The Rejection and Acceptance • Rejected by most geologists. • New data after WWI I led to the “plate tectonic revolution” in 1960’s....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/11/2011 for the course GEOL 1001 taught by Professor Baksi during the Spring '07 term at LSU.

Page1 / 66

ch02_online_notes - Chapter 2 Key concepts: • Continental...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online