Some notes on Heat Exchanger Design

Some notes on Heat Exchanger Design - Some notes on Heat...

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1 Some notes on Heat Exchanger Design Based on W Seider, JD Seader, DR Lewin Product and Process Design Principles Wiley , 2004. Heat transfer media • Goal – utilize other process streams to effect temperature change • If not possible – use Heat Transfer Media in utility exchangers – Coolants – cooling water is most common – Heat sources – steam is most common
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2 Coolants • Water - Cooling tower – Typically enters utility exchanger at 32 o C, exits at no higher than 50 o C. – Cooling tower – evaporation cools water back down to 32 o C. Evaporated water is replaced by treated water. – Process streams can be cooled down to ~38 o C. • Water - river or ocean – Seasonal variations in temperature will affect performance • If no water – air can be used – Process streams can be cooled down to ~50 o C More Cooling • If streams are very hot (>120 o C) – use the stream to produce steam in a boiler • If streams must be cooled to <38 o C – use utility exchangers with refrigerants – refrigeration cycles covered in your Thermodynamics course.
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3 Heating • Utility exchangers – steam is most common source of energy – Enters as saturated vapor – Exits as saturated liquid at same pressure and returned to boiler • Steam limit – about 370 o C (critical temperature is 374 o C); maintaining high pressures is expensive • For very high required outlet temperatures >230 o C – other media are used – e.g., Dowtherm A, heating oils, molten salts, molten
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This note was uploaded on 03/11/2011 for the course CHEME 333 taught by Professor Anthony during the Spring '11 term at UNL.

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Some notes on Heat Exchanger Design - Some notes on Heat...

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