Copy of Diana Dominguez - vol 2 10-19.docx - Pride and Prejudice STUDENT COPY Chapter XXXIII VOCabUl arY allusion \u2014 a reference inured \u2014 used to

Copy of Diana Dominguez - vol 2 10-19.docx - Pride and...

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Pride and Prejudice STUDENT COPY Chapter XXXIII VOCabUl arY allusion — a reference inured — used to; accustomed to penance — remorse; a hardship endured to compensate for wrongdoing tractable — obedient; changeable; flexible 1. Why can Fitzwilliam not pursue Elizabeth as a prospective bride? Colonel Fitzwilliam cannot pursue Eizabeth because she has no money and as he explains it, “younger sons cannot marry where they like.” 2. What is Elizabeth’s reaction when she learns Darcy has recently saved Bingley from “the inconveniences of a most imprudent marriage...”? (Pg. 165) When Colonel Fitzwilliam tells her Mr Darcy intervened in Jane and Mr. Bingley’s relationship, Elizabeth is stunned, “swelling with indignation.” 35 STUDY GUIDE Pride and Prejudice STUDENT COPY Chapter XXXIV
VOCabUl arY apprehension — worry derision — ridicule; scorn imputing — accrediting; attributing serenity — calmness; peace 1. Many critics believe this chapter is the most dramatic in the book. Do you agree? How does Austen’s style of writing serve to heighten the drama in this scene? In this chapter, Mr. Darcy declares to Elizabeth that he must tell her “how ardently I admire and love you,” setting the tone for this chapter, which is more romantic and soul searching than the other chapters. Elizabeth’s feelings, which are in the spotlight due to Austen’s style of writing, serve to only heightened the tensions and ultimate clash between Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth. 2. Why does Elizabeth feel compassion for Darcy when he proposes marriage to her? What does he say to change that feeling into anger? Elizabeth feels compassion for Darcy when he proposes marriage to her because of “the pain he was to receive.” However, she quickly loses her compassion for him when he continues to talk of his love for her as a degradation, of her inferior social status, and her terrible family connections. 3. What two reasons does Elizabeth give Darcy for her rejection of his proposal? Elizabeth swiftly rejects his proposal, saying than she has “never desired your good opinion, and you have certainly bestowed it most unwillingly.” She rejects him because of his role in ruining Jane’s relationship with Mr. Bingley, and his wrongs against Mr. Wickham. 36 STUDY GUIDE Pride and Prejudice STUDENT COPY Chapter XXXV VOCabUl
arY acute — careful connivance — a planning together; complicity propensities — tendencies remonstrance — difficulty; challenge repugnance — strong dislike 1. How does Darcy justify his decision to interfere in Bingley’s relationship with Jane? Mr. Darcy justifies his inference in Jane and Mr. Bingley’s relationship by saying that while he saw Mr. Bingley give her his attention, he perceived Jane receiving it “without participation of sentiment.” In other words, he believed Jane was not as in love with Mr. Bingley as he was with her.

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