carroll langdon write up

carroll langdon write up - other artworks from the same era...

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Matthew Psyllos 3/3/11 Brianna Bricker Thursday 9:00 Carroll and Langdon Write-Up This week’s write-up concerns two different articles about paintings from seventeenth and eighteenth century Europe. Margaret D. Carroll wrote “The Erotics of Absolutism: Rubens and the Mystification of Sexual Violence” in 1989 and Helen Langdon wrote “The Imaginative Geographies of Claude Lorrain” in 1996. The article by Carroll is about Peter Paul Rubens’ painting, Rape of the Daughters of Leucippus , and how it represents a cultural shift that Europe experienced in the early 1600s. Carroll argues that the tender expressions on the faces of the Dioscuri and the sensual treatment of a violent scene suggests the public’s taste for sexual pleasure over warlike confrontations, as well as the growing desire in males to assert dominance over women and take control of new lands. She supports her argument by comparing Rubens’ scene to
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Unformatted text preview: other artworks from the same era and relating it to signs of shifting policies in France. Carroll proves that Rubens idealized painting about sexual fantasy and conquest may well represent an emerging style and leading artistic goals of the 17 th century, but it most likely misconstrues the actual lifestyle trends of Europeans. The article written by Langdon is about the paintings of Italian artist Claude Lorrain and how his extraordinary landscapes evoked a sense of connection with nature and a longing to travel in their viewers. Langdon cements this point by examining a slew of Lorrains paintings and describing how Baroque people responded to his art with love and appreciation for nature and a growing desire to explore new wonders of the world in travel....
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