A Learning Environment Maturity Model_ Optimising Learning and Performance Systems Strategy

A Learning Environment Maturity Model_ Optimising Learning and Performance Systems Strategy

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A Learning Environment Maturity Model: Optimising Learning and Performance Systems Strategy Paul McKey PhD Candidate Southern Cross University [email protected] A/Prof. Allan Ellis Commerce and Management Southern Cross University [email protected] Abstract A Learning Environment Maturity Model (LEMM) is a necessary tool for optimising any organisation’s learning and performance systems strategy. Many current learning architectures and supporting systems are still predicated on pre-Web models which take little account of, or can gain little benefit from, the opportunities that digital technologies and rapidly changing socio-cultural trends can offer. In the evolution of organisational learning the next challenge is the design and implementation of interactive learning environments that will replace the current outdated passive and transaction-based, one-size-fits-all, learning systems and support the future autonomous learners that the modern organisation desires. Historical background The competitive strategy of organisations around the world shows a history of evolution. Through the Industrial Age it centred around access to resources, processes and markets. Now in the Information Age it can be argued that the competitive landscape is centred around people. Getting the right people, providing an environment for them to excel and nurturing their talent are all strategies many would now consider as necessary for success (Drucker, 2000; Collins, 2001; Pfeffer & Sutton, 2006). If nurturing people is an important organisational strategy one would expect that organisations would have a sophisticated and comprehensive, systems-based, learning and performance strategy to support this business need. Unfortunately any survey of national or international companies shows that this is rarely the case. The majority of organisational learning and performance systems strategies are still predicated upon the Industrial Age notion of training as a cost (of goods and services) rather than the Information Age need for learning as an investment (in ideas and people). Systems-based Learning and Performance Architectures To attract and retain the so called ‘talent’ which an effective organisation requires needs a comprehensive learning and performance architecture based upon both intrinsic and extrinsic reward systems, a careful blend of technology and presence and a close alignment with business strategy. Examples of such architectures, in our experience, are rare. Most architectures are a cacophony of reward systems, learning models, technology trends and a number of often uncoordinated learning programs based upon varying foci such as cost, skills, processes, intangibles like leadership, behaviours or competencies etc. The advantages of a coordinated systems-based learning and performance architecture could be many. Yet
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This note was uploaded on 03/13/2011 for the course PUK 202 taught by Professor Roth during the Spring '10 term at Universität Klagenfurt.

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A Learning Environment Maturity Model_ Optimising Learning and Performance Systems Strategy

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