Assessing e-Learning Readiness of Teachers and Schools in Hong Kong

Assessing e-Learning Readiness of Teachers and Schools in Hong Kong

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Assessing e-Learning Readiness of Teachers and Schools in Hong Kong SO, K. K. T. University of South Australia soykk002@students.unisa.edu.au SWATMAN, P. Solution Forrest paula@solutionforest.com.au Abstract: Based on the existing e-learning readiness assessment models designed for commercial firms and higher institutes, this research employs a quantitative method to develop an e-learning readiness model particularly for primary and secondary school teachers in Hong Kong. The research also finds a set of nine factors influencing teachers’ e-learning readiness, which is different from those affecting lecturers teaching in tertiary institutions and people working in commercial organisations. In addition, the variables affecting the e-learning readiness of in-service teachers in Hong Kong are significantly different from the set of variables affecting trainee teachers. 1. Introduction Since the 1990s it has become very clear that we are living in an information age and that society is becoming knowledge-based, rather than manufacturing-based. In the global economy information, distribution and production of knowledge become increasingly important (Cruz, Moraes, & Barcia, 1998). As a result, there is a growing demand for continuing education, flexible learning and different forms of professional training through new technologies. A possible way of achieving these goals is the introduction of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and e-learning into education (Fisser & Geloven, 2000). Hong Kong is not exempt from this global trend and is transforming itself into an Information Society. However, the use of ICT and e-learning in learning and teaching within Hong Kong schools has not been very effective to date. Working with IBM, the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) studied the e-learning readiness of 60 countries around the world. The study was released in 2003 and, at that time, Hong Kong was ranked as 19th out of 60 countries surveyed (EIU & IBM, 2003). While not disappointing in itself, this ranking was the lowest of the “Asian Four Small Dragons”, where South Korea, Singapore and Taiwan were ranked 5th, 6th and 16th respectively. As the methods of delivering an online curriculum are new and very different from those used in traditional teaching, instructors must be trained to make the most of new or updated teaching methods. A significant body of literature (see, for example, Heinrich, 1995; Fullan, 1994; Wang, 2002) supports the view that the way teachers teach is a product of their own schooling, training, and experiences. It is unfair to ask teachers to change their pedagogical approaches if they have not been given sufficient and appropriate training program in how to integrate ICT and new teaching technologies into their instruction programs. 2. Goal of the Research Project
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This note was uploaded on 03/13/2011 for the course PUK 202 taught by Professor Roth during the Spring '10 term at Universität Klagenfurt.

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Assessing e-Learning Readiness of Teachers and Schools in Hong Kong

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