{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Cultural Differences in Academic Online Courses Quality Perception and Assessment

Cultural Differences in Academic Online Courses Quality Perception and Assessment

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cultural Differences in Academic Online Courses Quality Perception and Assessment Manuela Milani ULP - Université Louis Pasteur Strasbourg - France [email protected]ulp.u-strasbg.fr Abstract: The aim of this paper is to explore the notion of quality of online education verifying if there’s a relation between this concept and the cultural dimension. The paper is part of a PhD research aimed at exploring the impact of cultural dimensions on the design of online courses. In particular, we intend to reveal differences between online courses' models designed in universities from different European areas in order to uncover which of them can be connected to the cultural dimension they belong. Introduction Nowadays an increasing number of virtual campuses are available and virtual mobility is becoming a reality for a large number of students (see, as an example of this trend, the relevance recognised to virtual camp uses by the European Commission, Decision No 2318/2003/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 December 2003, by encouraging the development of new organisational models for European universities – virtual campuses - and for European exchange and sharing schemes - virtual mobility - within the framework of activities of the eLearning Programme). In the last years this trend has been faced mainly from a technological point of view, concentrating the research efforts to understand how contents could be shared and so standards as CANCOR, AICC, SCORM, LOM have been developed. However another aspect has to be taken into consideration: the methodological one, at the moment underestimated. Different actors – and in particular teachers - took part in the building of various cross-national teaching and learning models as well as new social and organisational patterns. However, the multicultural dimension of this new environment is still not investigated, in particular the notion of “online teaching” quality is still unknown and under-exploited. This paper collocate this issue within a more general framework of a PhD research aimed at exploring the impact of cultural dimensions on the design of online courses. In particular, the research is aimed to reveal differences between online courses' models designed in universities belonging to different European areas, in order to uncover which of them can be connected to the cultural dimension they belong. Cultural differences and online teaching and learning The most evident feature of the current literature, in terms of the aim of our research, is the almost exclusive focus on the cultural differences emerging from Western-non Western learning contexts, being non-Western, in most cases, the Asian (Robinson 1999; Shattuck 2005) and, just in some cases, the Arabian (Al-Harthi 2005) students. The discussion of Western emphasis on individualism and of Eastern emphasis on collectivism (referring to the seminar work of Hofstede on cultural dimensions and differences) is well documented into the educational cross-cultural literature, but also here the term Western is used to describe a general Euro-United States and other Anglo-Saxon (Australia) perspective.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern