E-Learning Teams and Their Adult Learning Efforts in Corporate Settings A Cross Analysis of Four Cas

E-Learning Teams and Their Adult Learning Efforts in Corporate Settings A Cross Analysis of Four Cas

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E-Learning Teams and Their Adult Learning Efforts in Corporate Settings: A Cross Analysis of Four Case Studies BARBARA STEWART AND CONSUELO WAIGHT University of Houston, USA bstewart@uh.edu clwaight@uh.edu Four cases relating to the efforts of e-learning teams in valu- ing adult learners in their e-learning solutions were examined to better understand how e-learning teams value their adult learners within corporate settings. Two questions guided the analysis of the cases, they are 1. What is the nature of the e-learning solutions in these cases? 2. What strategies did the e-learning teams used to value adult learners? The nature of the e-learning solutions in these cases resulted in descriptions about e-learning context, e-learning format, types, and numbers of courses. The strategies that e-learning teams used to value adult learners related to front-end analysis, con- tent selection, content sequence, and presentation, interactions, standards, assessments, locations, and transfer. The analysis illustrated that e-learning teams and their efforts to value adult learners in their e-learning solutions are influenced by factors such as team size, team talent, company size, and technology. The results of the cross-case analysis offer a synthesis that e- learning teams can use for benchmarking and evaluation. E-learning solutions are no longer novelties in organizations, today they are rich test beds that can be examined for learning practices and philoso- phies. Waight and Stewart (2005) spoke with e-learning teams in four For- tune 500 companies who had e-learning solutions for four years or more. The interviews with the e-learning teams led to the development of four cases on how adult learners were valued in their e-learning solutions. While International Jl. on E-Learning (2008) 7 (2), 293-309
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individually the case studies provided indepth knowledge about how adult learners were valued, this article is focused on a cross analysis of the four cases. Two questions guided the cross-case analysis, they are: 1. What is the nature of the e-learning solutions in these companies? 2. What strategies do the e-learning teams use to value adult learners? A cross analysis of the four cases offers a composite description of mature e-learning solutions and allows for a comparison of strategies on how adult learners are valued. This cross case analysis also offers e-learning teams worldwide opportunities for benchmarking and evaluation. NATURE OF CORPORATE E-LEARNING The nature of corporate e-learning has undergone a continuum of change since its inception and has created a major revolution in the corporate learn- ing market. In the late 1990s, Wall Street took note of the e-learning indus- try and financial institutions such as Bank of America, W.R.Hambrecht, and Merrill Lynch started to focus on investments in the e-learning market (Rosenberg, 2001). In 1999, Bank of America Securities published the e- Bang Theory, which told a story of the demands and benefits of e-learning,
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This note was uploaded on 03/13/2011 for the course PUK 202 taught by Professor Roth during the Spring '10 term at Universität Klagenfurt.

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E-Learning Teams and Their Adult Learning Efforts in Corporate Settings A Cross Analysis of Four Cas

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