Islamic education in Indonesia and the potential for social transformation through engagement in onl

Islamic education in Indonesia and the potential for social transformation through engagement in onl

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Islamic education in Indonesia and the potential for social transformation through engagement in online communities Greg Barton School of Political and Social Inquiry Monash University greg.barton@arts.monash.edu.au Siew Mee Barton School of Management and Marketing Deakin University Australia siewmee@deakin.edu.au Muhammad Iqbal School of Political and Social Inquiry Monash University Australia muhammad.iqbal@arts.monash.edu.au Abstract This paper reports on findings from a group of Indonesia’s community of pesantren, or Islamic boarding schools, institutions. It examines of pesantren going online in a concerted fashion – not merely via a computer lab and IT classes, something that has been happening the more advanced pesantren for more than a decade – but by integrating eLearning platforms into their core teaching programs. The paper examines ways in which educators from different cultural mix within the pesantren community going online in a concerted fashion. Some of the key findings of this research are that the social capital dimensions of trust and reciprocity amongst individuals in the pesantren . In The Rural School Community Centre, Hanifan (1916) described the concept of social capital as those tangible substances that count for most in the daily lives of people. Pesantren have thus far only been using the Internet for the purposes of its religious teaching. A recent endeavour by the International Centre for Islam and Pluralism (ICIP) and the Ford Foundation, is aimed more at bringing general education to pesantren via the Internet. Introduction This paper examines an interesting phenomenon within Indonesia’s 25,000 strong community of pesantren , or Islamic boarding schools, institutions which elsewhere in the world would be known by the Arabic name madrasah . This is the phenomenon of pesantren going online in a concerted fashion – not merely via a computer lab and IT classes, something that has been happening the more advanced pesantren for more than a decade – but by integrating eLearning platforms into their core teaching programs. - 3766 -
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It is commonly assumed that pesantren and madrasah , being traditional Islamic institutions, must be overwhelmingly socially conservative and committed to propagating a narrow worldview. Whilst there is some truth in this the reality is much more complex. Many scholars of modern religious movements have observed that those movements that can be best described as fundamentalist tend to be led by those with only limited religious education in their tradition. In other words, fundamentalist movements tend to be lay movements. On the other hand, those who have obtained a deep level of scholarship in the religious tradition whilst conservative tend not to see the world in black and white terms, having been trained to understand the complexity and ambiguity when interpreting texts and being accustomed to the fact that respected scholars can take opposing views on many issues. The word
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Islamic education in Indonesia and the potential for social transformation through engagement in onl

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