Real Integration of ICT into Subject Content and Methodology Requires More than Technology, Infrastr

Real Integration of ICT into Subject Content and Methodology Requires More than Technology, Infrastr

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More than Technology, Infrastructure and Standard Software Harald Haugen, Stord/Haugesund University College, Norway; [email protected] Bodil Ask, University of Agder, Norway, [email protected] Abstract: A survey involving around 1000 teachers in 172 different Norwegian schools reveals that the dominant uses of ICT in classrooms are related to LMS, standard software and Internet browsing. Very few teachers indicate that they apply software or technology going deeper into their subject teaching, tools that could promote extra understanding and insight. Revision of teacher training, e.g. by exposing teachers to ICT supported, flexible and collaborative constructivist learning may change their attitude and willingness to change their own practice. Theoretical backgrounds as well as practical examples are crucial. As an example of subject integration, they may work with system dynamics, i.e. the construction of dynamic models, class discussions of flows and accumulations, mutual interactions of dependant variables etc. This may illustrate a possible exploitation of ICT in the learning of several school subjects and topics. Today’s high computer capacity, access to broadband and user friendly software, should count in favour of a growing potential here. Keywords: survey, ICT in schools, integration into subjects, teacher education, system dynamics, examples Status in Schools According to international comparative surveys, e.g. PISA (PISA 2006), the Norwegian results in reading, natural sciences and mathematical literacy appear to be very disappointing. Norwegian students at primary and secondary level score significantly lower than the OECD average. At the same time, Norway is on top using ICT in schools. Norwegian educational authorities have therefore been searching for possible relations to explain the gap between failing knowledge achievement and the investments made in new technology for schools. The Knowledge Promotion (Min of Ed, 2006) is one of the Ministry of Education and Research’s latest reforms for the 10-year compulsory school and for the upper secondary education and training. It introduced certain changes in substance, structure and organization from the first grade in primary to the end of upper secondary education and training. The reform took effect in autumn 2006. Under the Knowledge Promotion, schools are to prioritize the cultivation of 5 basic skills in all subjects (Info, 2006, p. 7): the ability to express oneself orally the ability to read the ability to do arithmetic the ability to express oneself in writing the ability to make use of information and communication technology We note that the fifth basic skill is directed towards ICT literacy, and that all 5 skills - including ICT - are to be incorporated at all levels and in all subjects. Research on ICT in Schools
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This note was uploaded on 03/13/2011 for the course PUK 202 taught by Professor Roth during the Spring '10 term at Universität Klagenfurt.

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Real Integration of ICT into Subject Content and Methodology Requires More than Technology, Infrastr

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