Montagu_Smallpox_1sheet

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Back to Modern History SourceBook Modern History Sourcebook: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762) : Smallpox Vaccination in Turkey In 1717 Lady Montague arrived with her husband, the British ambassador, at the court of the Ottoman Empire. She wrote voluminously of her travels. In this selection she noted that the local practice of deliberately stimulating a mild form of the disease through innoculation conferred immunity. She had the procedure performed on both her children. By the end of the eighteenth century, the English physician Edwardjenner was able to cultivate a serum in cattle, which, when used in human vaccination, eventually led to the worldwide eradication of the illness. A propos of distempers, I am going to tell you a thing, that will make you wish yourself here. The small-pox, so fatal, and so general amongst us, is here entirely harmless, by the invention of engrafting, which is the term they give it. There is a set of old women, who make it their business to perform the operation, every autumn, in the month of September, when the great heat is abated. People send to one another to know if any of their family has a mind to have the small-
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This note was uploaded on 03/13/2011 for the course HIST 131 taught by Professor Jacobmelish during the Winter '11 term at University of Cincinnati.

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Montagu_Smallpox_1sheet - Back to Modern History SourceBook...

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